Accepted Courses

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Scheduling over twenty courses to be held virtually is, of course, a challenging task. This year, the courses will be offered both during the weekend before the conference and during the main conference days, in parallel to the program. Sessions are planned to cover different timezones and some courses are duplicated to support a wider attendance.

 

Overview of Courses

 

Introduction to HCI

 

MetaHCI

 

Hot Topics

 

Design

 

Research Methods

 

Engineering

 

Professional Skills

 



 

List of Courses

 

C01: HCI History and Today’s Opportunities -- What We Anticipated, What We Did Not

 

1 unit 

 

Thursday May 13: JST 08-10 / CEST 00-02 / PDT 16-18 (previous day) / EDT 19-21 (previous day)

 

Human-computer interaction has entered a third, globally-connected era. Visions that drove research and development in the first era were realized in the second, with CHI a key player. The third presents opportunities and a need for creativity to address challenges. HCI has drawn on computer science, human factors, information systems, and information science. It relies on design and interacts with AI. Students, practitioners, and academics can gain an understanding of forces that have guided the interaction of related disciplines, constraints imposed by human nature, trajectories we are following, and opportunities and issues that will engage us in the years ahead.

 

Instructor(s)

 

Jonathan Grudin

Jonathan Grudin has attended and been involved with CHI since it began, contributing to methods and especially to the use of collaboration technologies in organizations. Prior to joining Microsoft Research, Jonathan was Professor of Information and Computer Science at UC Irvine. He is an ACM Fellow and CHI Academy member. His recent work has focused on education, AI technology, and a collaboration with a team studying novel crowdsourcing approaches in China.

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

 

A researcher from any field who has a focus on technology design and use can benefit by identifying branches of HCI most likely to provide appropriate insights. Students who would like to position their work, learn from the past, and identify considerations that have emerged and deserve attention can benefit. I started as a practitioner and was motivated to explore HCI history to better understand things I learned the hard way that can still be useful for others, either directly or by analogy. Everyone can profit from understanding tradeoffs that have shaped the HCI trajectory onto which they have jumped.

 


 

C02: How to Write CHI Papers, Online Edition

 

4 unit(s) | Course Website http://writing.chicourse.com/

 

Tuesday May 11: CEST 16-22 / PDT 08-14 / EDT 11-17 / JST 00-06 (next day)

 

Writing research papers can be extremely challenging for new academic authors or entire scientific communities, with their own review and style guidelines like CHI. The impact of everything that we do as researchers is based on how we communicate it. Writing for CHI is a core skill to learn because it is hard to turn a research project into a successful CHI publication. This online edition of the successful CHI paper writing course offers hands-on advice and more in-depth tutorials on how to write papers with clarity, substance, and style. It is structured into four online units with a focus on writing CHI papers.

 

Instructor(s)

 

Lennart E. Nacke

Lennart E. Nacke, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor for Human-Computer Interaction and Game Design at the University of Waterloo. He has taught the previous four iterations of this course at CHI since 2017. He runs the successful How to Write CHI Papers podcast and an interview series about writing CHI papers on YouTube. He has served on the SIGCHI program and steering committees and taught University graduate classes on HCI research methods. Dr. Nacke has co-organized many workshops for CHI over the past five years; he also chaired the CHI PLAY 2014 and Gamification 2013 conferences, served as technical program co-chair for CHI PLAY 2015 and CHI Games and Play subcommittee co-chair for CHI 2017, INTERACT 2019 Full Papers Co-Chair and was the chair of the CHI PLAY steering committee until 2018. He has also reviewed hundreds of papers and gotten lots of his own submissions rejected from CHI.

 

Intended Audience (Level: Intermediate)

 

This course introduces writing principles, including the newest meta findings of CHI papers, to a mainly junior audience. However, this does not mean that this course is not useful for senior CHI researchers, but junior researchers are the primary target audience. Thus, this course is beneficial for young researchers, ranging from graduate students to postdocs and junior faculty. The expectation for the course audiences is that people have at least tried to submit a paper to CHI before (not necessarily that they have had one accepted). They are familiar with basic PCS terminology and the CHI conference concept (and CHI research in general).

 


 

C03: Introduction to Explainable AI

 

1 unit(s) | Course Website https://hcixaitutorial.github.io/ 

 

Note: This course is presented twice. You can pick either of the two in your registration:

  1. Monday May 10: CEST 16-18 / PDT 08-10 / EDT 11-13 / JST 00-02 (next day)
  2. Wednesday May 12: CEST 16-18 / PDT 08-10 / EDT 11-13 / JST 00-02 (next day)

 

As Artificial Intelligence technologies are increasingly used to make important decisions and perform autonomous tasks, providing explanations to allow users and stakeholders to understand the AI has become a ubiquitous concern. Recently, a number of open-source toolkits are making the growing collection of Explainable AI (XAI) techniques accessible for researchers and practitioners to incorporate explanation features in AI systems. This course is open to anyone interested in implementing, designing and researching on the topic, aiming to provide an overview on the technical and design methods for XAI, as well as hands-on experience with an XAI toolkit.

 

Instructor(s)

 

Q. Vera Liao

Q. Vera Liao is a Research Staff Member in IBM Research AI. Her current research focuses are on explainable AI, human-centered machine learning, and conversational agents. Her research work received multiple awards at ACM CHI and IUI, and contributed to IBM’s Watson Assistant and AI Explainability. She actively organizes events that connect the HCI and AI communities, including several workshops and a panel at CHI, IUI and CSCW. She serves on the Editorial Board of International Journal of Human-Computer Studies (IJHCS) and ACM Transactions on Interactive Intelligent Systems (TiiS) , the Organizing Committee for IUI 2019 and CSCW 2021, and as an Associate Chair for multiple CHI and CSCW conferences. She received Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and Bachelor in Industrial Engineering from Tsinghua University. 

 

Moninder Singh

Moninder Singh is a Research Staff Member in the IBM Research AI organization at the IBM T. J.Watson Research Center. He received his Ph.D. in Computer and Information Science from the University of Pennsylvania in 1998. He is primarily interested in developing and deploying solutions for interesting analytics and decision support problems. His main research areas are machine learning and data mining, artificial intelligence, data privacy, information retrieval, probabilistic modeling and reasoning, and text mining. He has been actively working in issues of fairness and trust in AI, has contributed to the IBM’s AI Fairness 360 and AI Explainability 360 open-source toolkits, and has given several tutorials/ talks and published papers on issues relating to trust in AI models.

 

Yunfeng Zhang

Yunfeng Zhang is a Research Staff Member at IBM Research AI. His research interests lie in the intersection between HCI and AI. His recent research projects involved creating conversational agents, modeling social interactions, and studying AI explainability, fairness, and trust. He contributed to the IBM’s AI Fairness 360 and AI Explainability 360 open source toolkits, which are designed to help AI developers create intelligible and fair AI solutions. He received his Ph.D. in computer and information science from the University of Oregon in 2015.

 

Rachel Bellamy

Rachel K.E. Bellamy is a Principal Research Scientist and Chair of the Computer Sciences Council at IBM T J Watson Research Center. In this role she heads a Council that manages a Research portfolio of exploratory science projects. Prior to this, she led an interdisciplinary team of human-computer interaction researchers, user experience designers and software engineers. That team most recently contributed to several IBM Research’s Trusted AI projects, including the AI Fairness 360 and AI Explanability 360. Rachel received her doctorate in cognitive psychology from University of Cambridge, UK. She received a Bachelor of Science in psychology with mathematics and computer science from University of London. Before coming to IBM Research, she worked in Apple Computer’s Advanced Technology Group researching software support for collaborative learning.

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

 

The intended audience for this course are any CHI attendees who have already, or intend to engage in developing, designing and researching on the topic of XAI. The course does not require advanced knowledge in AI, data science or programming, though a basic understanding of machine learning concepts such as classification, training data, and features could be helpful. 

The course will include 15-20 minutes hands-on practice with Python code samples provided. Interested attendees could further explore the code but programming is not required. The course instructors will provide instructions to use the code samples, as well as introductory materials for machine learning and Python programming beforehand for interested attendees.

 


 

C04: Introduction to AI Fairness

 

1 unit(s) | Course Website https://github.com/Trusted-AI/AIF360/wiki/CHI-2021-Tutorial 

 

Note: This course is presented twice. You can pick either of the two in your registration:

  1. Monday May 10: JST 08-10 / CEST 00-02 / PDT 16-18 (previous day) / EDT 19-21 (previous day)
  2. Wednesday May 12: CEST 16-18 / PDT 08-10 / EDT 11-13 / JST 00-02 (next day)

 

Today, AI is used in many high-stakes decision-making applications in which fairness is an important concern. Already, there are many examples of AI being biased and making questionable and unfair decisions. Recently, the AI research community has proposed many methods to measure and mitigate unwanted biases, and developed open-source toolkits for developers to make fair AI. This course will cover the recent development in algorithmic fairness, including the many different definitions of fairness, their corresponding quantitative measurements, and ways to mitigate biases. This course is open to beginners and is designed for anyone interested in the topic of AI fairness.

 

Instructor(s)

 

Yunfeng Zhang

Yunfeng Zhang is a Research Staff Member at IBM Research AI. His research interests lie in the intersection between HCI and AI. His recent research projects involved creating conversational agents, modeling social interactions, and studying AI explainability, fairness, and trust. He contributed to the IBM’s AI Fairness 360 and AI Explainability 360 open source toolkits, which are designed to help AI developers create intelligible and fair AI solutions. He received his Ph.D. in computer and information science from the University of Oregon in 2015.

 

Rachel Bellamy

Rachel K.E. Bellamy is a Principal Research Scientist and Chair of the Computer Sciences Council at IBM T J Watson Research Center. In this role she heads a Council that manages a Research portfolio of exploratory science projects. Prior to this, she led an interdisciplinary team of human-computer interaction researchers, user experience designers and software engineers. That team most recently contributed to several IBM Research’s Trusted AI projects, including the AI Fairness 360 and AI Explanability 360. Rachel received her doctorate in cognitive psychology from University of Cambridge, UK. She received a Bachelor of Science in psychology with mathematics and computer science from University of London. Before coming to IBM Research, she worked in Apple Computer’s Advanced Technology Group researching software support for collaborative learning.

 

Q. Vera Liao

Q. Vera Liao is a Research Staff Member in IBM Research AI. Her current research focuses are on explainable AI, human-centered machine learning, and conversational agents. Her research work received multiple awards at ACM CHI and IUI, and contributed to IBM’s Watson Assistant and AI Explainability. She actively organizes events that connect the HCI and AI communities, including several workshops and a panel at CHI, IUI and CSCW. She serves on the Editorial Board of International Journal of Human-Computer Studies (IJHCS) and ACM Transactions on Interactive Intelligent Systems (TiiS) , the Organizing Committee for IUI 2019 and CSCW 2021, and as an Associate Chair for multiple CHI and CSCW conferences. She received Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and Bachelor in Industrial Engineering from Tsinghua University. 

 

Moninder Singh

Moninder Singh is a Research Staff Member in the IBM Research AI organization at the IBM T. J.Watson Research Center. He received his Ph.D. in Computer and Information Science from the University of Pennsylvania in 1998. He is primarily interested in developing and deploying solutions for interesting analytics and decision support problems. His main research areas are machine learning and data mining, artificial intelligence, data privacy, information retrieval, probabilistic modeling and reasoning, and text mining. He has been actively working in issues of fairness and trust in AI, has contributed to the IBM’s AI Fairness 360 and AI Explainability 360 open source toolkits, and has given several tutorials/ talks and published papers on issues relating to trust in AI models

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

 

The intended audience for this course is any CHI attendees who have already, or intend to engage in developing, designing and researching on the topic of AI fairness. The course does not require any advanced knowledge in AI, data science or programming, though a basic understanding of machine learning concepts such as classification, training data, and features could be helpful. The course will include 20-30 minutes hands-on practice with Python scripts provided. Interested attendees could further explore the code but programming is not required. Course instructors will provide introductory materials for machine learning and Python programming beforehand for interested attendees.

 


 

C05: An Introduction to Intelligent User Interfaces

 

4 unit(s) | Course Website https://iui-lecture.org/

 

Sunday May 9: JST 16-22 / CEST 08-14 / PDT 00-06 / EDT 03-09

 

Recent advancements in artificial intelligence (AI) create new opportunities for implementing a wide range of intelligent user interfaces. Speech-based interfaces, chatbots, visual recognition of users and objects, recommender systems, and adaptive user interfaces are examples that have majored over the last 10 years due to new approaches in machine learning (ML). Modern ML-techniques outperform in many domains of previous approaches and enable new applications. Today, it is possible to run models efficiently on various devices, including PCs, smartphones, and embedded systems. Leveraging the potential of artificial intelligence and combining them with human-computer interaction approaches allows developing intelligent user interfaces supporting users better than ever before. This course introduces participants to terms and concepts relevant in AI and ML. Using examples and application scenarios, we practically show how intelligent user interfaces can be designed and implemented. In particular, we look at how to create optimized keyboards, use natural language processing for text and speech-based interaction, and how to implement a recommender system for movies. Thus, this course aims to introduce participants to a set of machine learning tools that will enable them to build their own intelligent user interfaces. This course will include video-based lectures to introduce concepts and algorithms supported by practical and interactive exercises using python notebooks.

 

Instructor(s)

 

Albrecht Schmidt

Albrecht Schmidt is a full professor for Human Centered Ubiquitous Media in the Computer Science Department at LMU Munich. The focus of his work is on novel user interfaces to enhance and amplify human cognition. He is working on interaction techniques and intelligent interactive systems in the context of ubiquitous computing. In 2018 he was elected to the ACM CHI Academy.

 

Sven Mayer

Sven Mayer is an assistant professor for HCI at the LMU Munich. Prior to that, he was a postdoctoral researcher at the Carnegie Mellon University in the Future Interfaces Group and received his Ph.D. from the University of Stuttgart in 2018. He uses machine learning tools to design, build, and evaluate future human-centered interfaces in his research. This allows him to focus on hand- and body-aware interactions in contexts, such as mobile scenarios, augmented and virtual reality, and large displays.

 

Daniel Buschek

Daniel Buschek leads a junior research group at the intersection of Human-Computer Interaction and Machine Learning / Artificial Intelligence at the University of Bayreuth, Germany. Previously, he worked at the Media Informatics Group at LMU Munich, where he had also completed his doctoral studies, including research stays at the University of Glasgow, UK, and Aalto University, Helsinki. In his research, he combines HCI and AI to create user interfaces that enable people to use digital technology in more effective, efficient, expressive, explainable, and secure ways.

 

Intended Audience (Level: Intermediate)

 

This course addresses anyone interested in intelligent user interfaces, particularly researchers and practitioners in human-computer interaction and machine learning. Besides the conceptual foundations, the course includes many examples and hence is suitable for participants interested in the practical aspects of developing and implementing IUIs. In particular, the course does not assume or require prior knowledge in computational methods, Machine Learning, or Artificial Intelligence. Participants can expect to concretely benefit from the course by gaining an overview and basic understanding of intelligent user interfaces and their possibilities, for example, for further investigation in their own research and practical projects. To facilitate this, the course provides concrete takeaways and material, including practical examples and pointers to further relevant work.

 

Prerequisite

This is a self-contained course. General programming knowledge is required to follow the coding examples (Python). Course participants are expected to prepare for the course by watching the provided intro lecture videos (see next section).

 


 

C06: Conversational Voice User Interfaces: Connecting Engineering Fundamentals to Design Considerations

 

2 unit(s) | Course website:  http://www.speech-interaction.org/CHI2021course

 

Note: This course is presented twice. You can pick either of the two in your registration:

  1. Tuesday May 11: CEST 16-19 / PDT 08-11 / EDT 11-14 / JST 00-03 (next day)
  2. Thursday May 13: JST 08-11 / CEST 00-03 / PDT 16-19 (previous day) / EDT 19-22 (previous day)

 

HCI research has for long been dedicated to better and more naturally facilitating information transfer between humans and machines. Unfortunately, humans' most natural form of communication, speech, is also one of the most difficult modalities to be understood by machines – despite, and perhaps, because it is the highest bandwidth communication channel we possess. While significant research efforts, from engineering, to linguistic, and to cognitive sciences, have been spent on improving machines' ability to understand speech, the CHI community (and the HCI field at large) has only recently started embracing this modality as a central focus of research. This can be attributed in part to the unexpected variations in error rates when processing speech, in contrast with often-unfounded claims of success from industry, but also to the intrinsic difficulty of designing and especially evaluating speech and natural language interfaces. As such, the development of interactive speech-based systems is mostly driven by engineering efforts to improve such systems with respect to largely arbitrary performance metrics. Such developments have often been void of any user-centered design principles or consideration for usability or usefulness in the same ways as graphical user interfaces have benefited from heuristic design guidelines. 

The goal of this course is to inform the CHI community of the current state of speech and natural language research, to dispel some of the myths surrounding speech-based interaction, as well as to provide an opportunity for researchers and practitioners to learn more about how speech recognition and speech synthesis work, what are their limitations, and how they could be used to enhance current interaction paradigms. Through this, we hope that HCI researchers and practitioners will learn how to combine recent advances in speech processing with user-centered principles in designing more usable and useful speech-based interactive systems."

 

Instructor(s)

 

Cosmin Munteanu

Cosmin Munteanu is an Assistant Professor at the Institute for Communication, Culture, Information, and Technology (University of Toronto at Mississauga), and Director of the Technologies for Ageing Gracefully lab. Until 2014 he was a Research Officer with the National Research Council of Canada, where he designed mobile and immersive natural user interfaces for a wide range of applications. His area of expertise is at the intersection of Human-Computer Interaction, Automatic Speech Recognition, Natural Language Processing, Mobile Computing, and Assistive Technologies. He has extensively studied the human factors of using imperfect speech recognition systems, and has designed and evaluated systems that improve humans' access to and interaction with information-rich media and technologies through natural language. Cosmin's multidisciplinary interests include speech and natural language interaction for mobile devices, mixed reality systems, learning technologies for marginalized users, assistive technologies for older adults, and ethics in human-computer interaction research. Cosmin is one of the founders of the Conversational User Interfaces (CUI) conference series, and for the past almost ten years has organized numerous workshops on this topic at conferences such as CHI, MobileHCI, IUI, CSCW.

 

Gerald Penn

Gerald Penn Penn is a Professor of Computer Science at the University of Toronto. His area of expertise is in the study of human languages, both from a mathematical and computational perspective. Gerald is one of the leading scholars in Computational Linguistics, with significant contributions to the formal study of natural languages. His publications cover many areas, from Theoretical Linguistics, to Mathematics, and to Automatic Speech Recognition, as well as Human-Computer Interaction.

 

Christine Murad

Christine Murad is a PhD candidate in Computer Science at the University of Toronto, and member of the Technologies for Ageing Gracefully lab. Her research looks at the usability and design of conversational voice interfaces, and exploring the development of different tools and resources to aid in intuitive and user-friendly conversational voice interaction. She has co-organized several related workshops at CHI '19 - '20, IUI '20 and CSCW '20. She is currently serving on the steering committee for CUI 2020/2021 conference series.

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

 

All HCI researchers and practitioners are welcome. There is no prerequisite knowledge or experience, besides an interest in the topic and broad familiarity with general HCI research and concepts. 

 


 

C07: Design for Wellbeing – Methods and Strategies for Supporting Psychological Needs in User Experience

 

2 unit(s) | Course Website http://www.positivecomputing.org/p/chi-2021.html 

 

Note: This course is presented twice. You can pick either of the two in your registration:

  1. Saturday May 8: JST 18-21 / CEST 10-13 / PDT 02-05 / EDT 05-08
  2. Thursday May 13: JST 18-21 / CEST 10-13 / PDT 02-05 / EDT 05-08

 

While leading technology companies have created “digital wellbeing” initiatives in response to public concern over psychological impacts, these largely focus on changing human behavior (eg. via self-tracking and ‘screen time’ restriction) rather than on changing technology.  If respect for human wellbeing is to become a genuine priority with measurable impact, then technology will need to change too.  Designers are in a position to lead this change by integrating wellbeing psychology into design practice. This course will equip technology-makers with research-based knowledge and skills for practicing “wellbeing supportive design”, and for improving UX across the board by supporting psychological health.

 

Instructor(s)

 

Dorian Peters

Dorian Peters is a designer, researcher and author who specializes in design for health and wellbeing, design for learning, and digital ethics in practice. She works at the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence at the University of Cambridge and at Imperial College London. Her books include Interface Design for Learning (New Riders) and Positive Computing (MIT Press), and she is a founding editorial member of the journal, AI and Ethics. 

 

Rafael A. Calvo

Rafael A. Calvo is Chair of Engineering Design at the Dyson School of Design Engineering, Imperial College London. He is also Imperial College Co-lead at the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence, and co-editor of the IEEE Transactions on Technology and Society.  He focuses on the technical design of systems that support wellbeing in areas of mental health, medicine and education, often applying techniques in machine learning, natural language processing and data analytics. He has published 4 books and over 200 papers on these topics.

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

 

Appropriate for HCI professionals of any background and at any point in their career who are interested in improving user experience through a better understanding of wellbeing psychology and how to apply it to design.

 

 


 

C08: Rapid Prototyping of XR Experiences

 

3 unit(s) | Course Website http://xr-prototyping.org

 

Saturday May 8: JST 08-13 / CEST 00-05 / PDT 16-21 (previous day) / EDT 19-24 (previous day)

 

This course introduces participants to rapid prototyping for augmented and virtual reality. Participants will learn about physical prototyping with paper and Play-Doh and digital prototyping via visual authoring tools. After an overview of the XR prototyping process and tools, participants will complete two hands-on sessions. A combination of paper-based XR design templates and easy-to-use digital authoring tools will be used to create working interactive prototypes that can be run on XR devices. The course is targeted at non-technical audiences including HCI practitioners, user experience researchers, and interaction design professionals, and students interested in XR design.

 

Instructor(s)

 

Mark Billinghurst

Mark Billinghurst is Professor of Human-Computer Interaction at the University of South Australia in Adelaide, Australia, and Professor in the BioEngineering Institute at the University of Auckland in New Zealand. He earned a PhD in 2002 from the University of Washington and researches innovative computer interfaces that explore how virtual and real worlds can be merged, publishing over 500 research papers in topics such as wearable computing, Augmented Reality and mobile interfaces. Prior to joining the University of South Australia he was Director of the HIT Lab NZ at the University of Canterbury, in Christchurch, New Zealand. He has also previously worked at British Telecom, Nokia, Google, and the MIT Media Laboratory. He received the 2013 IEEE VR Technical Achievement Award for contributions to research and commercialization in AR and in 2019 the IEEE VGTC Virtual/Augmented Reality Career Award for lifetime contributions to Human-Computer Interactions for Augmented and Virtual Reality. He has been teaching classes on AR and VR since 2003, including many courses at ACM SIGCHI and SIGGRAPH.

 

Michael Nebeling

Michael Nebeling is an Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan School of Information, where he directs the Information Interaction Lab (https://mi2lab.com). He earned his PhD in 2012 from ETH Zurich and his current research contributes new techniques, tools, and technologies to make XR interface development easier and faster. He received a Disney Research Faculty Award and a Mozilla Research Award for his work on empowering XR designers and end-users in 2018. He started his role as the XR Faculty Innovator-in-Residence with Academic Innovation’s U-M wide XR Initiative in 2019. He regularly serves on the program committees of the ACM CHI and UIST conferences. He is papers co-chair of UIST 2021. He has been teaching XR focused courses for the past 5 years. He taught a similar XR prototyping course at CHI 2019. He is the creator of the XR MOOC series on Coursera (http://xrmooc.com) that shares many goals of this CHI course.

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

 

The intended audience are those people who are interested in XR and in creating XR experiences, but don’t necessarily have a strong programming or engineering background. This includes not only XR researchers and designers, but also HCI practitioners, and user experience and interaction design professionals in industry, as well as students who have an interest in rapid prototyping for mixed reality. The course is suitable for people with no particular programming or design experience. There is no assumed background and there will be links provided ahead of time to tools that can be downloaded to be used during the course.

 

Prerequisite

The course is designed for non-technical audiences. Participants with basic knowledge in HCI, user experience, and interaction design will find the contents of this course accessible. There is no need for programming. However, for more advanced participants, the instructors will also be able to share tips and resources, including information on how the techniques could be incorporated with advanced XR development workflows with tools like Unity or Unreal.

 


 

C09: When Artificial Intelligence Alone is not Enough: End-User Creation and Control of Daily Automations

 

1 unit(s) | Course Website https://giove.isti.cnr.it/Users/Fabio/humanation.html

 

Tuesday May 11: JST 16:30-18 / CEST 08:30-10 / PDT 00:30-02 / EDT 03:30-05

 

The combination of the Internet of Things and Artificial Intelligence has made it possible to introduce numerous automations in our daily environments. Many new interesting possibilities and opportunities have been enabled, but there are also risks and problems. Often these problems are originated from approaches that have not been able to consider the users’ viewpoint sufficiently. We need to empower people in order to actually understand the automations in their surrounding environments, modify them, and create new ones, even if they have no programming knowledge. The course discusses these problems and some possible solutions to provide people with the possibility to control and create their daily automations.

 

Instructor(s)

 

Fabio Paternò

Fabio Paternò is Research Director at CNR-ISTI, where he founded and leads a laboratory on Human Interfaces in Information Systems. He was co-editor of the book on End-User Development (1000+ citations on Google scholar), and the follow-up on New Perspectives in End-User Development. He was one of the co-editors of a TOCHI special issue on End-User Development for the Internet of Things. He is an ACM Distinguished Scientist and an ACM Distinguished Speaker. He has already given courses or tutorials at CHI, INTERACT, Mobile HCI; HCI International. He is the scientific coordinator of the AAL PETAL project (http://www.aal-petal.eu/) and the PRIN EMPATHY (http://www.empathy-project.eu/) project where the issues and solutions discussed in the course have been investigated. 

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

 

The course is interesting for designers, developers, and researchers who want to understand the issues involved in introducing automations in daily environments, and the corresponding possible solutions that can empower end-users in controlling, modifying and creating new ones. It also allows them to understand the relevant state of art in order to think about novel solutions in this area. 

 

Prerequisite

There is no particular prerequisite for attending the course. Some basic knowledge of Internet of Things technologies would make it easier to follow it, but all the relevant concepts will be introduced in such a way to be understandable also to those who are not familiar with them.

 


 

C10: Designing with the Mind in Mind: The Psychological Basis of User Interface Design Guidelines

 

2 unit(s) 

 

Monday May 10: CEST 16-19 / PDT 08-11 / EDT 11-14 / JST 00-03 (next day)

 

UI design rules and guidelines are not simple recipes.  Applying them effectively requires determining rule applicability and precedence and balancing trade-offs when rules compete.  By understanding the underlying psychology, designers and evaluators enhance their ability to apply design rules. This two-part course explains that psychology.

 

Instructor(s)

 

Jeff Johnson

Jeff Johnson is a Professor in the Computer Science Department of the University of San Francisco. After earning B.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Yale and Stanford, he worked at Cromemco, Xerox, US West, Hewlett-Packard Labs, and Sun Microsystems. In 1990, he co-chaired the first Participatory Design conference, PDC'90.  He serves on the SIGCHI U.S. Public Policy Committee. He has also taught at Stanford University and Mills College, and in 2006 and 2013 he taught HCI as an Erskine Fellow at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand. He is a member of the ACM SIGCHI Academy, a SIGCHI Lifetime Achievement in Practice Awardee, and an ACM Distinguished Member. He has authored or co-authored many articles and chapters on Human-Computer Interaction, as well as the books GUI Bloopers, Web Bloopers, GUI Bloopers 2.0, Designing with the Mind in Mind, Conceptual Models (co-authored with Austin Henderson), Designing with the Mind in Mind, 2nd edition, Designing UIs for an Aging Population (co-authored with Kate Finn), and Designing with the Mind in Mind, 3rd edition.

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

 

This course is intended for software designers and developers of all experience levels, especially those who did not take perceptual and cognitive psychology in college or who want to update their knowledge of it. Others who may benefit: Software Q/A engineers, usability testers, development managers. 

 


 

C11: Designing Technology for an Aging Population

 

1 unit(s)

 

Sunday May 9: CEST 16-18 / PDT 08-10 / EDT 11-13 / JST 00-02 (next day)

 

The population of the developed world is aging. Most websites, apps, and digital devices are used by adults aged 50+ as well as by younger adults, so they should be designed accordingly. This one-part course, based on the presenter’s recent book, presents age-related factors that affect older adults’ ability to use digital technology, as well as design guidelines that reflect older adults’ varied capabilities, usage patterns, and preferences.

 

Instructor(s)

 

Jeff Johnson

Jeff Johnson is a Professor in the Computer Science Department of the University of San Francisco. After earning B.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Yale and Stanford, he worked at Cromemco, Xerox, US West, Hewlett-Packard Labs, and Sun Microsystems. In 1990, he co-chaired the first Participatory Design conference, PDC'90. He serves on the SIGCHI U.S. Public Policy Committee. He has also taught at Stanford University and Mills College, and in 2006 and 2013 he taught HCI as an Erskine Fellow at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand. He is a member of the ACM SIGCHI Academy, a SIGCHI Lifetime Achievement in Practice Awardee, and an ACM Distinguished Member. He has authored or co-authored many articles and chapters on Human-Computer Interaction, as well as the books GUI Bloopers, Web Bloopers, GUI Bloopers 2.0, Designing with the Mind in Mind, Conceptual Models (co-authored with Austin Henderson), Designing with the Mind in Mind, 2nd edition, Designing UIs for an Aging Population (co-authored with Kate Finn), and Designing with the Mind in Mind, 3nd edition.

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

 

This course is intended for software designers and developers of all levels of experience. Others who might benefit: Software Q/A engineers, usability testers, and development managers. 

 


 

C12: Introduction to Computational Design

 

1 unit(s) | Course Website https://koyama.xyz/courses/chi2021-computational-design

 

Wednesday May 12: JST 08-10 / CEST 00-02 / PDT 16-18 (previous day) / EDT 19-21 (previous day)

 

Computational design is one of the hot topics in HCI and related research fields, where various design problems are formulated using mathematical languages and solved by computational techniques. By this paradigm, researchers aim at establishing highly sophisticated or efficient design processes that otherwise cannot be achieved. Target domains include graphics, personal fabrication, user interface, etc. This course introduces fundamental concepts in computational design and provides an overview of the recent trend. It then goes into a more specific case where human assessment is necessary to evaluate the quality of design outcomes, which is often true in HCI scenarios. This course is recommended to HCI students and researchers who are new to this topic.

 

Instructor(s)

 

Yuki Koyama

Yuki Koyama is a Researcher at National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan. He has been working on computational design for years in HCI and graphics domains and published papers on this topic at important venues such as CHI, UIST, SIGGRAPH, and SIGGRAPH Asia. His recent interest is to apply computational techniques for formulating and supporting design processes that involve preferential assessment by humans; for example, he has worked on supporting parametric visual designs using crowdsourcing, machine learning, and Bayesian methods. He is also interested in solving computational design problems in the personal fabrication domain. He received his Ph.D.\ from the University of Tokyo in 2017.

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

 

Anyone with interest in computational design can attend this course. Students, researchers, and practitioners who are novices to this topic are especially welcomed.

 


 

C13: Designing for Sensory Appreciation: Cultivating Somatic Approaches to Experience Design

 

2 unit(s) 

 

Part 1: Wednesday May 12: JST 22-00 / CEST 14-16 / PDT 06-08 / EDT 09-11

 

Part 2: Thursday May 12: JST 22-00 / CEST 14-16 / PDT 06-08 / EDT 09-11

 

This course explores somatic approaches to experience design in HCI. Designing for Sensory Appreciation focuses on cultivating our bodily sensory experience as a resource for design. This course exemplifies how somatic approaches can be applied through sensory appreciation in the form of case studies that incorporate experience-based activities. We have tailored this course for online experiential activities that link theory with practice in the context of HCI design exemplars. The course invites a rethinking of the process of designing for technology based on the emerging somatic turn within Human-Computer Interaction that acknowledges design for the experience of the self and recognizes the interiority of human experience as an equal partner in technological design processes.

 

Instructor(s)

 

Thecla Schiphorst

Thecla Schiphorst is a Professor in SIAT at Simon Fraser University. She has a 30 year history in designing for body-centered interaction and is one of forerunners of introducing somatic design to HCI.

 

Lian Loke

Lian Loke is an Associate Professor in Design Computing, and Director of the Master of Interaction Design and Electronic Arts. Her research is at the nexus of performance, somatics, design and technology, and explores aesthetics of body-based interaction.

 

Kristina Höök

Kristina Höök is Professor of Interaction Design at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm. Her book Designing with the Body: Somaesthetic Interaction Design (MIT Press) introduces soma design; a process that reincorporates body and movement into design

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

 

The intended audience members are HCI design practitioners, researchers and students that are interested in applying somatic practices such as sensory appreciation to interaction design processes. Audience members may be new to the topic or have prior experience in soma-design or body-based design explorations. We will conduct a pre-course poll in order to introduce new material.

 


 

C14: Inbodied Interaction 101: A First Course in Practical Anatomy & Physiology for HCI Designers, Researchers and Engineers

 

2 unit(s) | Course Website https://wellthlab.ac.uk/inbodied101-21

 

Monday May 10: CEST 16-19 / PDT 08-11 / EDT 11-14 / JST 00-03 (next day)

 

While increasing numbers of HCI Designers or Researchers design tools for health and wellbeing, few have a background in human anatomy and physiology. Inbodied Interaction 101 provides a fundamental orientation to human anatomy and physiology specifically framed for HCI designers, researchers, and engineers that students will be able to use immediately to inform their own designs. The models offer practical orientation for any designer interested in developing tools to support human performance, health, and wellbeing, both physically, socially, and cognitively. It will help anyone whose work touches the human body – from mixed reality to behaviour mediation, all of which are mediated by the state of the body.  Students will learn fundamental physiological parameters within our anatomy to support these states. Students will also test these approaches in class, to see how they can be used for both evaluation and design of innovative, inbodied-aligned designs.

 

Instructor(s)

 

m.c. schraefel

m.c. is a professor of computer science and human performance. She leads the WellthLab in Human-Systems interaction in the UK, where the mission is to use science, engineering and design to explore how interactive technology can #makeNormalBetter @scale for all. Her research ranges from consideration of musculo-skeletal strength to address workplace chronic pain [2] to developing inbodied interaction as an approach for performance rather than prevention-oriented health design [5]. She co-leads the Body as a Starting Point workshops and Inbodied Interaction Summer School. m.c. is also a certified strength and conditioning coach (NCSA CSCS), nutritionist and functional neurology coach. 

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

 

The course is designed for anyone interested in HCI research/design that involves the human body. This includes researchers in health and wellbeing, exergames, cognitive performance, mindfulness, sport.

There are no prerequisites. Anyone with an interest in how our bodies work internally in particular, and how that knowledge can inform HCI design to support human performance in all its variants of social, physical, cognitive, emotional, is welcome. 

 


 

C15: Inbodied Interaction 102: Exploring Neuro-Physio Pathways & Measures for Health Design (& Self-Tuning)

 

2 unit(s) | Course Website www.wellthlab.ac.uk/inbodied102-21

 

Wednesday May 12: CEST 16-19 / PDT 08-11 / EDT 11-14 / JST 00-03 (next day)

 

In Inbodied Interaction 101, we considered the Physiology and Anatomy of the body via three associated interactions that reflect an inbodied state: 1. inbodied adaptation in response to the in5 and C4 over Time and Context in order to maintain 2. homeostasis via 3. metabolism. We called this adaptation process “tuning.” In 102 we build on this foundation to consider the physiology tuning. In particular, we will look at a series of inbodied interactions: the neuro-endocrine system interaction with the organ systems that cue adaptive responses from genetic signals to fat metabolism; the autonomic nervous system and the limbic system’s interactions that affect volitional/non-volitional interaction. We will introduce the components of the brainstem, basal nuclei, and cerebellum that support interoception around self-Tuning. Within this framing, we will look at the strengths and limits of non-invasive measures of these processes (eg, HRV, EEG, blood oxygen saturation, qualitative responses). Outcomes will familiarity with how we function as inbodied complex systems, with worked examples of how the physiology of tuning can be translated into interactive designs to support health, wellbeing, performance in new ways.

 

Instructor(s)

 

m.c. schraefel

m.c. is a professor of human performance and computer science. She leads the WellthLab in Human-Systems interaction, where the mission is to use science, engineering and design to explore how interactive technology can #makeNormalBetter @scale for all. 

 

Josh Andres

Josh leads HCI research at IBM Research, Australia, and has published particularly in exertion games, and is a founder of the Body as a Starting Point workshop series – he leads work on the use of Peripheral Awareness for eBike acceleration control.

 

Aaron Tabor

Aaron is a PhD student in Computer Science/HCI at UNB. His work focuses on rigorous interrogation of the use of HRV as a measure of the efficacy of breathing rate in particular, and the connection of breathing depth in cognitive performance. He is interested in developing cognitive assessment test suites for personal self-assessment of health interventions

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

This course is designed for anyone who designs systems to aid human potential, performance, wellbeing and who wants to explore and open the possibilities of their design space, to help people build the knowledge, skills and practice we need as individuals and within groups to thrive together.  

Prerequisite

This course is open to participants from the Inbodied Interaction 101 course or from the Inbodied Interaction Summer School. If you are interested in this course without having these pre-requisites, please make a case to the organizers at [II-102@nopain2.org]  

 


 

C16: Automated Vehicles as a Space for Work & Wellbeing

 

2 unit(s) | Course Website https://ubisys.org/chi21-course-automated-vehicles

 

Wednesday May 12: CEST 16-19 / PDT 07-10 / EDT 10-13 / JST 23-02 (ends next day)

 

The objective of this CHI course is to provide CHI attendees with an introduction and overview of the rapidly evolving field of automotive user interfaces (AutomotiveUI). The course will focus on UI aspects in the transition towards automated driving. In particular, we will also discuss the opportunities of cars as a new space for non-driving-related activities, such as work, relaxation, and play. For newcomers and experts of other HCI fields, we will present the special properties of this field of HCI and provide an overview of new opportunities, but also the general design and evaluation aspects of novel automotive user interfaces.

 

Instructor(s)

 

Bastian Pfleging

Bastian Pfleging (https://www.tue.nl/staff/b.pfleging) is assistant professor for Future Mobility at Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands. His research interests are user interfaces for future mobility, multimodal interaction, workload, external interfaces for automated cars and non-driving-related activities. Future Cars as a Space for Work & Play CHI ’21, May 08–13, 2021, Yokohama, Japan He was involved in co-organizing various workshops and courses (e.g., at AutomotiveUI, and CHI, Bastian is actively involved in organizing conferences like CHI, UIST, AutomotiveUI, MobileHCI and is steering committee member of AutomotiveUI.

 

Andrew L. Kun

Andrew L. Kun (http://www.andrewkun.com) is Pprofessor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of New Hampshire. His research focus is human-computer interaction in vehicles, as well as the use of visual behavior and pupil diameter measures to assess and improve the design of interfaces. He is the steering committee chair of AutomotiveUI.

 

Orit Shaer

Orit Shaer (http://cs.wellesley.edu/~mobileoffice/) is Associate Professor of computer science and director of Media Arts and Sciences at Wellesley College. Her expertise is in designing, implementing and evaluating novel human-computer interactions including augmented reality, and tangible interaction. She served as program co-chair of the 2020 ACM Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction (TEI) conference.

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

We target a broad audience including AutomotiveUI novices (students, industrial / academic researchers), but also researchers, practitioners, & designers with experiences in creating AutomotiveUIs. With driving automation, we see the car as a novel platform for interactive systems, which is interesting for attendees of a variety of backgrounds.

 

Prerequisite

The expected audience should have a basic knowledge of HCI. This could be a previously attended course or a basic university lecture or experiences from prior projects in this domain. There are no additional prerequisites.

 


 

C17: Statistics for HCI

 

2 unit(s) | Course Website https://alandix.com/statistics/

 

Note: This course is presented twice. You can pick either of the two in your registration:

  1. Monday May 10: JST 16-19 / CEST 08-11 / PDT 00-03 / EDT 03-06
  2. Tuesday May 11: JST 16-19 / CEST 08-11 / PDT 00-03 / EDT 03-06

 

Many researchers find statistics confusing. This course aims to help change that, to give attendees an understanding of the meaning of the various statistics they see in papers or need to use in their own work.  The course builds on the instructor's previous tutorials and masterclasses including at CHI 2017, and on his recently published book “Statistics for HCI: Making Sense of Quantitative Data”. The course will focus especially on the material you will not find in a conventional textbook or statistics course including aspects of statistical 'craft' skill, and it will also offer the attendees an introduction to some of the instructor's extensive additional online material.

 

Instructor(s)

 

Alan Dix

Alan Dix is currently Professor and Director of the Computational Foundry at Swansea University, a £30 million programme to nurture fundamental digital research for human good . He is well known for his HCI textbook and research in HCI including CSCW, mobile interfaces, technical creativity, and some of the earliest work on privacy and ethical implications of intelligent data processing. More recent work includes community engagement especially in rural areas and his one thousand mile research walk aroundWales, which generated substantial quantitative and qualitative open research data from blogs to biodata. However, before he was in HCI, Alan was a mathematician, including representing the UK in the International Mathematical Olympiad. He has practiced as a professional statistician and applied mathematician including work on modelling agricultural crop sprays, medical statistics and undersea cable detection. Within HCI these skills have been applied in his foundational work on formal methods for interactive systems, the use of Bayesian techniques in education, random sampling for visualisation of big data and uncertainty, and analysis of potential bias against human/applied areas in REF, the UK research assessment exercise. This unusual combination of skills and experience gives Alan a unique insight into the issues and problems when applying statistics to HCI data, which he has recently embodied in a recent Morgan & Claypool volume “Statistics for HCI: making sense of quantitative data”.

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

The course is intended for both experienced researchers and students who have already, or intend to engage in quantitative analysis of empirical data or other forms of statistical analysis. It will also be of value to practitioners using quantitative evaluation.

 

Prerequisite

The course will assume some familiarity with statistical concepts theoretical or practical, for example, the use of t-tests or similar techniques. There will be occasional formulae, but the focus of the course is on conceptual understanding not mathematical skills.

 


 

C18: Evaluation in Human-Computer Interaction - Beyond Lab Studies

 

1 unit(s) | Course Website https://hci-lecture.org/methods/

 

Note: This course is presented twice. You can pick either of the two in your registration:

  1. Tuesday May 11: CEST 16-18 / PDT 08-10 / EDT 11-13 / JST 00-02 (next day)
  2. Wednesday May 12: JST 16-18 / CEST 08-10 / PDT 00-02 / EDT 03-05

 

Many research contribution is human-computer interaction base their evaluation on user studies in the lab. In this course, we take a broader look at approaches for research that does not require lab studies. We present a set of evaluation methods and also at research contributions that do not rely on user studies in lab studies. The discussion focuses on research approaches, data collection methods, and tools that can be conducted without direct interaction between the researchers and the participants.

 

Instructor(s)

 

Albrecht Schmidt

Albrecht Schmidt is a full professor of Human Centered Ubiquitous Media in the Computer Science Department at LMU Munich. The focus of his work is on novel user interfaces to enhance and amplify human cognition. He is working on interaction techniques and intelligent interactive systems in the context of ubiquitous computing. In 2018 he was elected to the ACM CHI Academy.

 

Florian Alt

Florian Alt is an full professor of Usable Security and Privacy at the Bundeswehr University Munich. His research focuses on howsecurity can be made an integral part of user-centered design and howubiquitous computing technologies can help building systems that are both usable and secure. Specific research topics include but are not limited to behavioral biometrics, usable security in smart homes, security concepts based on physiological data, and secure AR and VR interfaces. He chaired the CHI subcommittee on Usability and User Experience in 2020 and 2021.

 

Ville Mäkelä

Ville Mäkelä is a postdoctoral researcher in the Human Centered Ubiquitous Media group at LMU Munich. His research focuses on virtual reality, ubiquitous computing, and games. His primary research topic is about how virtual reality can be utilized for research purposes, including how studies can be conducted remotely during a pandemic. He is an associate chair (AC) in the Usability and User Experience subcommittee at CHI ’21.

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

 

This course addresses anyone interested in conducting evaluations beyond lab studies. The course assumes basic knowledge in conducting user studies. Participants can expect to concretely benefit from the course by gaining an overview and basic understanding of out-of-the-lab research approaches, their opportunities and pitfalls, so as to facilitate the approaches’ application in their own research and practical projects. To facilitate this, the course provides concrete takeaways and material, including practical examples and pointers to further relevant work.

 

Prerequisite

The course is self-contained and assumes a general knowledge and interest in methods in Human-Computer interaction. The information presented is on an overview level and aims at helping to identify appropriate approaches to research. Learning about the details of the specific methods is beyond the scope of this course and requires further reading.

 


 

C19: Dealing with Ethical Challenges in HCI Fieldwork

 

2 unit(s) | Course Website www.hci-ethics.org/CHI2021

 

Tuesday May 11: JST 08-11 / CEST 00-03 / PDT 16-19 (previous day) / EDT 19-22 (previous day)

 

We are witnessing an increase in fieldwork within the field of HCI, particularly involving marginalized or under-represented populations. This has posed ethical challenges for researchers during such field studies, with "ethical traps" not always identified during planning stages. This is often aggravated by the inconsistent policy guidelines, training, and application of ethical principles. We ground this in our collective experiences with ethically-difficult research and frame it within common principles that are common across many disciplines and policy guidelines – representative of the instructors’ diverse and international backgrounds.

 

Instructor(s)

 

Cosmin Munteanu

Prof. Cosmin Munteanu is an Assistant Professor at the Institute for Communication, Culture, Information, and Technology at University of Toronto Mississauga and Director of the Technologies for Ageing Gracefully lab. Cosmin has conducted research on the ethical aspects of conducting technology-centric ethnographies and fieldwork and on issues of digital divides and interactive technologies for marginalized populations. Cosmin is an organizer for the Workshop on Ethical Encounters in Human-Computer Interaction (held at ACM CHI 2015, 2016, and 2017), which aims to engage multidisciplinary researchers in a dialogue about the ethical challenges faced in fieldwork with emerging interactive technologies. He has served as scientific reviewer for ethics applications during his tenure at the National Research Council Canada, is currently a member of the ACM SIGCHI Committee on Ethics, and is actively conducting research in the field of ethics as a recipient of a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Knowledge Synthesis Grant.

 

Jenny Waycott

Dr. Jenny Waycott is a Lecturer in the Department of Computing and Information Systems at the University of Melbourne. Her current work focuses on the design and use of new technologies to support older adults who are socially isolated. Jenny is the principal organizer of the CHI Workshop Series on “Ethical Encounters in HCI”, as well as serving as a full member on the ACM SIGCHI Ethics Committee. 

 

Roisin McNaney

Dr. Roisin McNaney is a Senior Lecturer with the Department of Human Centred Computing at Monash University. Her research interests focus around the role that digital technologies might play in supporting self-monitoring and management Practices in people with Parkinson's specifically and chronic health conditions more generally. She comes from a clinical background originally and has experience working in both clinical and HCI research environments. She is one of the organizers of the Workshop on Ethical Encounters in HCI held at CHI 2016 and 2017.

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

 

The course welcomes all attendees with interest in or who have conducted field studies of mobile interactive technologies, regardless of the particular ethics approval process or policy framework that is relevant to their discipline or country where this is conducted.

 


 

C20: Working with Children in HCI: Research, Design and Evaluation

 

3 unit(s) | Course Website www.chici.org/course

 

Wednesday May 12: JST 16-21 / CEST 08-13 / PDT 00-05 / EDT 03-08

 

Child Computer Interaction is concerned with the research, design, and evaluation of interactive technologies for children.  Whilst many aspects of general HCI can be applied to this field, there are important adaptations to be made when conducting work for and with children throughout all stages of the design cycle.  This course overviews the main tools and techniques in use by the CCI community presented alongside examples and experiences from academia and industry. The course is hands-on and provides highly useful checklists and tips to ensure children (and researchers and developers) get the most out of participation in HCI activities.

 

Instructor(s)

 

Janet Read

Janet C Read is a Professor of Child Computer Interaction. Currently researching cross cultural CCI, childlike computing, the ethics of children’s participation and visual programming, Prof. Read is the founding editor of the International Journal of Child Computer Interaction, a previous chair (on two occasions) of the ACM Interaction Design and Children (IDC) Conference and a former chair of the ACM Child Computer Interaction Community. She is widely published in CCI and HCI. 

 

Shuli Gilutz

Dr Shuli Gilutz is a research fellow at Tel-Aviv university, and an instructor at the Shenkar Toy Invention Program. She is a Google for Startups accelerator UX research mentor, as well as a board member of the D4CR Association [6]. She has been researching the design of digital environments for children for over 20 years, in academia and industry, and has been an active member of the ACM IDC conference community. She consults companies on strategy, design and research for/with children, and is a global speaker on these topics.

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

 

This course is ideal for researchers, practitioners and designers who are interested in the research and design of digital environments for children (of all age groups). In past courses, participants included researchers, practitioners, and students. 

 

There are no prerequisite besides a basic understanding of HCI methods and/or UX research methods.

 


 

C21: Let's Sketch! A Hands-on Introductory Course on Sketching in HCI

 

2 unit(s) | Course Website https://sketchhci.wordpress.com/

 

Note: This course is presented twice. You can pick either of the two in your registration:

  1. Saturday May 8: CEST 17-20 / PDT 09-12 / EDT 12-15 / JST 00-03 (next day)
  2. Sunday May 9: JST 16-19 / CEST 08-11 / PDT 00-03 / EDT 03-06

 

Sketching is a universal activity but an often overlooked skill – yet it can benefit researchers and practitioners in HCI – sketching has proven to be a valuable addition to skill-sets in academic and industrial contexts. Many individuals lack the confidence to take up sketching after years of non-practice, but it is possible to re-learn, improve, and apply this skill in practical ways. This course is a sketching journey, from scribbles and playful interpretations, to helpful theory, storytelling, and practical applications. Attending individuals will learn techniques and applied methods for utilizing sketching within the context of HCI, guided by experienced instructors.

 

Instructor(s)

 

Makayla Lewis

Makayla Lewis is a lecturer in Technology Innovation at Birmingham City University, researching and teaching human factors in business, cybersecurity, smart money, and AI. Makayla is an accomplished visual thinker and sketcher who organizes sketching events and courses and provides visuals for international companies and conferences such as ACM CHI & ISS.

 

Miriam Sturdee

Miriam Sturdee is a research fellow in Creative Practice in Computing at Lancaster University, specialising in investigating how sketching and the arts can support the design and development of novel technology. She also has an MFA in Visual Communication from Edinburgh College of Art. 

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

 

The content of this course is suitable for individuals from industry and academia that have an interest in learning and or improving their sketching skills. Novices, experts and those with an interest are welcome to attend.

 

Prerequisite

Attendees should have experience with sketching, but prior knowledge regarding its HCI applications is not required.

 


 

C22: Drifting by Intention – Four Epistemic Traditions in Constructive Design Research

 

4 unit(s) | Course Website http://drifting-by-intention.net 

 

Thursday May 13: JST 16-22 / CEST 08-14 / PDT 00-06 / EDT 03-09

 

It is subsumed that to appreciate a knowledge contribution in research-through-design, we all agree on what the act of designing is and should deliver in research. However, just from a glance at contributions in an HCI context, this is far from the case. The course is based on the book: Drifting by intention – four epistemic traditions in constructive design research authored by the instructors. It unpacks different ways of knowing in practice-based design and provides operational models and hands-on exercises applied on participants’ cases to help plan and articulate the contribution of design in each participant’s individual research project.

 

Instructor(s)

 

Peter Gall Krogh

Peter Gall Krogh is trained as architect and product designer. He is Professor in Design and heads the Socio-Technical Design group at the Department of Engineering at Aarhus University. Prior to this he was professor in design at Aarhus School of Architecture, visiting professor in Politecnico di Milano, Hong Kong PolyU and recently at Jiangnan University. He contributes to service and interaction design both in doing and theorizing based on co-design techniques with a particular interest in aesthetics, collective action and proxemics. In recent years this has played out in relation to designing for patient experiences in healthcare. His recent book: Drifiting by Intention: Four Epistemic Traditions from within Constructive Design Research describes what design look like and how it can be approached when developing knowledge is equally important as providing opportunities by design. He has published mores than 70 papers, chaired several conferences and held numerous editorial positions in design research and SIGCHI publication fora. He has supervised more than 10 PhDs and examined more than twice as many.

 

Ilpo Koskinen

Ilpo Koskinen has a PhD in sociology, but he has worked as a professor of design since 1999 in Helsinki, Melbourne, Hong Kong, and now in Sydney. His main research interests have been in mobile multimedia, the relationship of design and cities, and interpretive design methodology. Some of his main publications include books Mobile Image, Empathic Design, Mobile Multimedia in Action, Design Research through Practice. From Lab, Field, Showroom, and Drifting by Intention: Four Epistemic Traditions from within Constructive Design Research. His most recent interest have been around social design and unobtrusive design methods. He has published about 150 papers, some of them good (he thinks), supervised to completion 13 PhD students and examined about 40, held numerous editorial positions, and chaired several conferences, most recently DIS 2018. 

 

Intended Audience (Level: Advanced)

 

The key CHI audiences of the course are: master students working to become doctoral students, Doctoral students using design to build knowledge, doctoral student supervisors. Industry researchers in interdisciplinary constructive work environments of both small and large scale companies; supervisors of doctoral students venturing into research-through-design and constructive design research. The key takeaways for each of these audiences are for: Master students insights into how to frame constructive design research; Doctoral students will get acquainted with practical tools for documenting, tracking and discussing research while agilely steering the research work in a fruitful direction; Supervisors will get insights into how other constructive design researchers worked with dilemmas native to the wicked problems of constructive design research. Researchers in industry will find tools and inspiration for how and under which conditions it is fruitful to embed the research approach in their particular context.

 

Prerequisite

Interested participants will be asked to submit a 2-pages position paper describing their research and its experimental challenges. It is an advantage if attendees have experience in design as a constructive practice such as product design, interaction design, design engineering, service design and similar.

 


 

C23: Introductory Course on Automation and its Use for Interactive Systems Design and Engineering

 

1 unit(s) | Course Website https://sites.google.com/view/chi-2021-course-on-automation

 

Tuesday May 11: JST 08-10 / CEST 00-02 / PDT 16-18 (previous day) / EDT 19-21 (previous day)

 

This course takes both a practical and theoretical approach to introduce the principles, methods, and tools for automation. Examples are taken from industries that have been embedding automation in their systems for a long time (such as aviation, automotive, satellite ground segments…), but the main focus is on designing and assessing automation for interactive systems. Interactive hands-on exercise of how to "do it right", will be provided answering questions such as: How to add automation in interaction techniques to improve efficiency? How to migrate tasks towards automation to improve effectiveness? How to design usable automation at system, application, and interaction levels? Is more automation always better? If not, when do we stop automating? And more...

 

Instructor(s)

 

Philippe Palanque

Philippe Palanque is professor in Computer Science at the University Toulouse 3 and is head of the ICS (Interactive Critical Systems) research group at IRIT Lab. Since the early 90’s his research focus is on interactive systems engineering proposing notations, methods and tools to integrate multiple properties such as usability, dependability, resilience and more recently user experience. These contributions have been developed together with industrial partners from various application domains such as civil aviation, air traffic management or satellite ground segments. Recently he has been involved in the specification of future interactive cockpits and their interactions and in the modelling of operational states of civil aircraft (with direct support from and close collaboration with Airbus). The main driver of Philippe’s research over the last 20 years has been to address in an even way Usability, Safety and Dependability in order to build trustable safety critical interactive systems. He has been working in the area of automation for more than ten years, was a member of the SESAR Higher Automation Levels in Aviation network of excellence and paper co-chair of ATACCS (Application and Theory of Automation in Command and Control Systems) 2015 conference. He was steering committee chair of the CHI conference series at ACM SIGCHI, is a member of the CHI academy and chair of IFIP Technical Committee on Human-Computer Interaction (TC13). He edited and co-edited more than twenty books or conference proceedings including the "Handbook on Formal Methods in Human-Computer Interaction" published by Springer in 2017.

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

 

This course is open to researchers, practitioners, educators and students of all experience levels. No specific skills or knowledge are required beyond a background in User Centered Design. The paper “A model for types and levels of human interaction with automation. Systems, Man and Cybernetics, Part A: Systems and Human” (Parasuraman, R.; Sheridan, T.B. & Wickens, C.D. 2000) should be read before attending the lecture. 

 


 

C24: Introduction to Service Design for UX Designers

 

2 unit(s) | Course Website https://blogs.aalto.fi/chisdcourse

 

Tuesday May 11: CEST 15-18 / PDT 07-10 / EDT 10-13 / JST 23-02 (finishes next day)

 

We are witnessing the work of user experience (UX) designers expanding beyond single digital products towards designing customer journeys through several service touchpoints and channels. Greater understanding of the service design approach and the interplay between service design and UX design is needed by UX researchers and practitioners in order to address this challenge. This course provides a theoretical introduction to service design and practical activities that help attendees understand the principles of service design and apply key methods within their work. It is targeted at UX design practitioners, teachers, and researchers, and those interested in systemic approaches to design.

 

Instructor(s)

 

Virpi Roto

Virpi Roto is Professor of Practice in Experience Design in Aalto University, Finland. She studies experience design in the intersection of UX and service design. Her methodological research aims to provide techniques for practitioners to improve user experiences. She was the responsible instructor of the first edition of this course at NordiCHI’20. She was also the lead organizer of NordiCHI’16, CHI’18, and Nordes’19 workshops on the relation of UX and service design.

 

Val Mitchell

Val Mitchell is Programme Director of the UX Design MA at Loughborough University. Her research focusses on the development of transdisciplinary tools and methods for UX and SD and she has been a co-organizer of workshops at CHI2013 and UBICOMP14.

 

Stuart Cockbill

Stuart Cockbill specializes in teaching service design as part of the UX Design MA at Loughborough University. His research uses co-design processes to incorporate personal data within the design of future technologies and services.

 

Jung-Joo Lee

Jung-Joo Lee is a Deputy Head of Research and Assistant Professor in Division of Industrial Design, National University of Singapore, and a Director of Service Design Lab Singapore. Her research investigates roles of service design in organizational transformation and public-sector innovation. She was a co-organizer of workshops at CHI’15, CHI’18, and Nordes’19. 

 

Effie Lai-Chong Law

Effie Law is a full Professor in HCI, specialising in usability and UX methodologies. She was a co-organizer of NordiCHI’16, CHI’18 and Nordes’19 workshops on the relation between UX and Service Design. She was an instructor for the course on UX evaluation at CHI.

 

John Zimmerman

John Zimmerman is the Tang Family Professor of AI and HCI at Carnegie Mellon University’s HCI Institute. His research investigates human-AI interaction. He teaches courses on UX design, service design, lean startup, and on the design of AI products and services.

 

Intended Audience (Level: Easy)

 

The course is intended primarily for UX design practitioners, teachers, researchers, and students, and secondarily for attendees with an interest in systemic approaches to design. As this is an introductory course, the participants are not expected to have any prior knowledge of service design. Basic understanding of UX design and user centric design processes will be helpful to understand the similarities and differences between SD and UX design.

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