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Accepted Workshops & Symposiums

The ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems is the premier international conference of Human-Computer Interaction. Workshops and symposiums (we'll refer to both of them as workshops on this page) are a gathering place for attendees with shared interests to meet in the context of a focused and interactive discussion. They are a great way to discuss emerging and important topics with leaders in the field, and a great place to connect with people working in similar areas. Workshops are organized independently by their organizers. Submission information can be found on the websites of the individual workshops. Typically, participation is limited to people who have submitted position papers in advance, although that varies widely across workshops, and some workshops may welcome observers.

 

Scheduling over fifty workshops to be held virtually is, of course, complicated. This year, workshops will be held both the weekend before and the weekend after the main conference. We consulted several times with the organizers, with the conference chairs, and after a lot of deliberation, discussed in more detail here, settled on a plan where there are three workshop slots a day:

 

  • Slot A is JST 0600-1000 / EDT 1700 (day before)-2100 (day before) / CEST 2300 (day before)-0300
  • Slot B is JST 1300-1700 / EDT 0000-0400 / CEST 0600-1000
  • Slot C is JST 2200-0200 (next day) / EDT 0900-1300 / CEST 1500-1900.

 

The times as shown here are a first approximation of the schedule; you should check on individual websites, linked below, for the final time, and you should be aware that there's at least a possibility that times may change from what is listed here. Multiple timeslots don't necessarily mean that workshop will use all of those timeslots; consult the workshop's webpage for details.

 

Jofish Kaye & Hideaki Kazuoka

CHI 2021 Workshop & Symposium Chairs

workshops@chi2021.acm.org

 

List of Workshops & Symposiums

 

 



 

Workshop Details

 

W01: Coping with Messiness in Ethnography: Authority, Bias, and Immersion in Ethnographic Fieldwork in the Non-Western World

 

First Session: 7 May JST 0600-1000 / 6 May EDT 1700-2100 / 6 May CEST 2300 - 7 May CET 0300
Second Session: 8 May JST 0600-1000 / 7 May EDT 1700-2100 / 7 May CEST 2300 - 8 May CET 0300

 

Ethnography has firmly established its position in the Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) community. Many studies have benefited from following ethnographic approaches to arrive at a grounded and comprehensive understanding of the respective research context. Applying that to the non-Western world, however, comes with challenges for researchers. Aside from ethical concerns which have been addressed in the past, we want to use this workshop to foster conversations and discussions on authority, bias and immersion when conducting ethnographic field work in the non-Western world – especially as a Western researcher. The main objective of this workshop is to exchange experiences and to identify common aspects and ways of overcoming, coping with or even embracing the messiness in ethnographic work and derive guidelines based on these discussions.

 

Organizers:

Marios Mouratidis, University of Siegen
Sarah Rüller, University of Siegen
Konstanin Aal, University of Siegen
Nina Boulus-Rodje, Roskilde University
Shaimaa Lazem, City of Scientific Research and Technology Applications
Anicia Peters, University of Namibia
Simon Holdermann, University of Cologne
Vasilis Vlachokyriakos, Newcastle University
Ann Light, University of Sussex
Dave Randall, University of Siegen
Volker Wulf, Institute of Information Systems and New Media

 


 

W02: Smell, Taste, and Temperature Interfaces

 

First Session: 7 May JST 0600-1000 / 6 May EDT 1700-2100 / 6 May CEST 2300 - 7 May CET 0300
Second Session: 8 May JST 0600-1000 / 7 May EDT 1700-2100 / 7 May CEST 2300 - 8 May CET 0300
Third Session: 9 May JST 0600-1000 / 8 May EDT 1700-2100 / 8 May CEST 2300 - 9 May CET 0300

 

Everyday life hinges on smell, taste, and temperature-based experiences, from eating to detecting potential hazards (e.g., smell of rotten food, microbial threats, and non-microbial threats such as from hazardous gases) to responding to thermal behavioral changes. These experiences are formative as visceral, vital signals of information, and contribute directly to our safety, well-being, and enjoyment. Despite this, contemporary technology mostly stimulates vision, audition, and – more recently – touch, unfortunately leaving out the senses of smell taste and temperature. In the last decade, smell, taste, and temperature interfaces have gained a renewed attention in the field of Human Computer Interaction, fueled by the growth of virtual reality and wearable devices. As these modalities are further explored, it is imperative to discuss underlying cultural contexts of these experiences, how researchers can robustly stimulate and sense these modalities, and in what contexts such multisensory technologies are meaningful. This workshop addresses these topics and seeks to provoke critical discussions around chemo- and thermo-sensory HCI.

 

Organizers:

Jas Brooks, University of Chicago
Pedro Lopes, University of Chicago
Judith Amores Fernandez, MIT
Emanuela Maggioni, University College London
Haruka Matsukura, Osaka University
Marianna Obrist, University College London
Roshan L Peiris, Rochester Institute of Technology
Nimesha Ranasinghe, University of Maine

 


 

W03: Speculating on Biodesign in the Future Home

 

First Session: 7 May JST 0600-1000 / 6 May EDT 1700-2100 / 6 May CEST 2300 - 7 May CET 0300
Second Session: 8 May JST 0600-1000 / 7 May EDT 1700-2100 / 7 May CEST 2300 - 8 May CET 0300

 

The home is a place of shelter, a place for family, and for separation from other parts of life, such as work. Global challenges, the most pressing of which are currently the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change has forced extra roles into many homes and will continue to do so in the future. Biodesign integrates living organisms into designed solutions and can offer opportunities for new kinds of technologies to facilitate a transition to the home of the future. Many families have had to learn to work alongside each other, and technology has mediated a transition from standard models of operation for industries. These are the challenges of the 21st century that mandate careful thinking around interactive systems and innovations that support new ways of living and working at home. In this workshop, we will explore opportunities for biodesign interactive systems in the future home. We will bring together a broad group of researchers in HCI, design, and biosciences to build the biodesign community and discuss speculative design futures. The outcome will generate an understanding of the role of interactive biodesign systems at home, as a place with extended functionalities.

 

Organizers:

Phillip Gough, The University of Sydney
Jack Forman, MIT
Pat Pataranutaporn, MIT
Leigh-Anne Hepburn, The University of Sydney
Carolina Ramirez-Figueroa, Royal College of Art
Clare Cooper, The University of Sydney
Angela Vujic, MIT
David Sun Kong, MIT
Raphael Kim, Queen Mary University
Pattie Maes, MIT
Hiroshi Ishii, MIT
Misha Sra, UC Santa Barbara
Naseem Ahmadpour, The University of Sydney

 


 

W04: Immersive Inclusivity at CHI: Design and Creation of Inclusive User Interactions Through Immersive Media

 

First Session: 7 May JST 1300-1700 / 7 May EDT 0000-0400 / 7 May CEST 0600-1000
Second Session: 8 May JST 1300-1700 / 8 May EDT 0000-0400 / 8 May CEST 0600-1000

 

Immersive media is becoming increasingly common in day-to-day scenarios: from extended reality systems to multimodal interfaces. Such ubiquity opens an opportunity for building more inclusive environments for users with disabilities (permanent, temporary, or situational) by either introducing immersive and multimodal elements into existing applications, or designing and creating immersive applications with inclusivity in mind. Thus the aim of this workshop is to create a discussion platform on intersections between the fields of immersive media, accessibility, and human-computer interaction, outline the key current and future problems of immersive inclusive design, and define a set of methodologies for design and evaluation of immersive systems from inclusivity perspective.

 

Organizers:

Bektur Ryskeldiev, University of Tsukuba; Mercari R4D
Yoichi Ochiai, University of Tsukuba
Koki Kusano, Merpay, Inc.
Jie Li, Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica
MHD Yamen Saraiji, Keio University
Kai Kunze, Keio University
Mark Billinghurst, University of South Australia
Surunga Nanayakkara, Auckland Bioengineering Institute, The University of Auckland
Yusuke Sugano, The University of Tokyo
Tatsuya Honda, FUJITSU Limited

 


 

W05: Out of Your Mind? Embodied Interaction in Sports

 

First Session: 7 May JST 1300-1700 / 7 May EDT 0000-0400 / 7 May CEST 0600-1000
Second Session: 8 May JST 1300-1700 / 8 May EDT 0000-0400 / 8 May CEST 0600-1000

 

People engage in sportive activities for reasons beyond improving their athletic performance. They also seek experiences like fun, adventure, a feeling of oneness, clear their heads, and flow. Since sport is a highly bodily experience, we argue that taking an embodied interaction perspective to inspire interaction design of sports systems is a promising direction in HCI research and practice. This workshop will address the challenges of designing interactive systems in the realm of sports from an embodied interaction perspective focusing on athletes' experience rather than performance. We will explore how interactive systems enhance sports experience without distracting from the actual goal of the athlete, such as freeing the mind. We will focus on several topics of interest such as sensory augmentation, augmented experience, multi-modal interaction, and motor learning in sports.

 

Organizers:

Vincent van Rheden, University of Salzburg
Thomas Grah, University of Salzburg
Alexander Meschtscherjakov, University of Salzburg
Rakesh Patibanda, Monash University
Wanyu Liu, IRCAM Centre Pompidou
Florian Daiber, DFKI, Saarland Informatics Campus
Elise van den Hoven, University of Technology Sydney; Eindhoven University of Technology
Florian Floyd Mueller, Monash University

 


 

W06: Asian CHI Symposium: HCI Research from Asia and on Asian Contexts and Cultures

 

First Session: 7 May JST 1300-1700 / 7 May EDT 0000-0400 / 7 May CEST 0600-1000
Second Session: 8 May JST 1300-1700 / 8 May EDT 0000-0400 / 8 May CEST 0600-1000

 

The Asian CHI symposium 2021 is the joint event organized by the researchers and practitioners in Asia. The symposium aims to bring together young and senior researchers from the academics and industries in one forum to exchange ideas and foster social network in the field of HCI. The symposium showcases the latest HCI work from Asia and those focusing on incorporating Asian sociocultural factors in their design and implementation. In addition to circulating ideas and envisioning future research in human-computer interaction, this symposium aims to foster social networks among academics (researchers and students) and practitioners and grow a research community from Asia.

 

Organizers:

Adi Tedjasaputra, UX Indonesia
Briane Paul V. Samson, De La Salle University
Masitah Ghazali, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia
Eunice Sari, UX Indonesia
Sayan Sarcar, University of Tsukuba
Dilrukshi Gamage, University of Moratuwa
Kazuyuki Fujita, Tohoku University
Pranjal Jain, TheUXWhale
Amit Jena, IITB-Monash Research Academy
Toni-Jan Keith Palma Monserrat, University of the Philippines Los Baños
Nabila Sindi, KAIST
Kaixing ZHAO, University of Toulouse
Jordan Aiko Deja, De La Salle University
Manvi Fotedar, Srishti Manipal Institute of Art, Design and Technology
Manjiri Joshi, IIT Bombay
Yangi Li, Kochi University
Zhicong Lu, University of Toronto
Akihiro Matsufuji, Tokyo Metropolitan University
Shio Miyafuji, Tokyo Institute of Technology
Korok Sengupta, University of Koblenz-Landau
Diksha Singh, IIT Bombay
Simran Singh, Srishti Manipal Institute of Art, Design and Technology
Umar Taufiqulhakim, KAIST

 


 

W07: Social VR: A New Medium for Remote Communication and Collaboration

 

Only Session: 7 May JST 2200 - 8 May JST 0200 / 7 May EDT 0900-1300 / 7 May CEST 1500-1900

 

We are facing increasingly pressure on reducing travel and working remotely. Tools that support effective remote communication and collaboration are much needed. Social Virtual Reality (VR) is an emerging medium, which invites multiple users to join a collaborative virtual environment (VE) and has the potential to support remote communication in a natural and immersive way. We successfully organized a CHI 2020 Social VR workshop virtually on Mozilla Hubs, which invited researchers and practitioners to have a fruitful discussion over user representations and ethics, evaluation methods, and interaction techniques for social VR as an emerging immersive remote communication tool. In this CHI 2021 virtual workshop, we would like to organize it again on Mozilla Hubs, continuing the discussion about proxemics, social cues and VE designs, which were identified as important aspects for social VR communication in our CHI 2020 workshop.

 

Organizers:

Jie Li, Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica
Vinoba Vinayagamoorthy, BBC Research & Development
Julie Williamson, University of Glasgow
David A. Shamma, Rochester Institute of Technology
Pablo Cesar, Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica; Delft University of Technology

 


 

W08: Designing for New Forms of Vulnerability

 

Only Session: 7 May JST 2200 - 8 May JST 0200 / 7 May EDT 0900-1300 / 7 May CEST 1500-1900

 

Our workshop will concentrate on vulnerability of specific social groups due to various reasons, including COVID-19, and the potential for technology design to result in empowerment. We want to address issues of what new forms of vulnerabilities emerge and how we can design digital environments in a way that acknowledges vulnerability but also has the potential to empower people in ways that are meaningful for them. When planning the workshop, we will also reflect on social situations that can result in vulnerabilities for participants. Therefore, we will ensure that interested participants will experience low barriers to participation include a variety of people with different backgrounds and ensure that interaction happens based on equality principles and in an atmosphere of solidarity. Participants can exchange ideas and thoughts without worrying about being exposed to biased assumptions. The workshop will allow for non-hierarchical and cooperative discussion and collaboration through interactive online exercises, resulting in a collaboratively developed zine. Finally, the social sustainability of the workshop will be ensured through a website, mailing lists, joint publications and continuous contact.

 

Organizers:

David Struzek, University of Siegen
Katerina Cerna, University of Siegen
Richard Paluch, University of Siegen
Sven Bittenbinder, University of Siegen
Claudia Müller, University of Siegen; Careum
Arlind Reuter, Newcastle University
Lydia Stamato, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Ozge Subasi, Koc University
Foad Hamidi, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
John Vines, University of Edinburgh

 


 

W09: Decolonizing Design Practices: Towards Pluriversality

 

Only Session: 7 May JST 2200 - 8 May JST 0200 / 7 May EDT 0900-1300 / 7 May CEST 1500-1900

 

Decolonizing discourses teach us that we need to move away from the universalizing 'grand narratives' of knowledge production and focus on contextualizing diverse and situated experiences, epistemologies and narratives. Yet, few contributions actively demonstrate what a shift to decolonizing design means in practice. Participatory Design (PD) approaches are particularly well-suited to contributing to contemporary debates of decolonization in design due to PD's long-standing political traditions and values of equality and empowerment, but even here empirical methods and techniques to fully realize pluriversality in design are lacking. In line with the CHI 2021 theme of Making Waves. Combining Strengths, this interactive workshop will invigorate the debates and practices in HCI of decolonization by bringing together and demonstrating how designers and researchers in diverse global contexts are working with and adapting modes, concepts, methodologies and sensibilities into decolonizing design practices. Not only will this workshop provide new ways of thinking in HCI but also fuse theories and practices to develop truly transcultural approaches to HCI.

 

Organizers:

Rachel Charlotte Smith, Aarhus University
Heike Winschiers-Theophilus, Namibia University of Science and Technology
Daria Loi, Mozilla Corporation
Rogerio Abreu de Paula, IBM Research
Asnath Paula Kambunga, Aarhus University
Marly Muudeni Samuel, Glasgow School of Arts
Tariq Zaman, University College of Technology Sarawak

 


 

W10: Opinions, Intentions, Freedom of Expression, ..., and Other Human Aspects of Misinformation Online

 

Only Session: 7 May JST 2200 - 8 May JST 0200 / 7 May EDT 0900-1300 / 7 May CEST 1500-1900

 

As a wicked problem, limiting the harm caused by misinformation requires merging multiple perspectives to the design of digital interventions, including an understanding of human behaviour and motivations in judging and promoting false information, as well as strategies to detect and stop its propagation without unduly infringing on rights or freedoms of expression. Tools and online services are continuously being developed to support different stakeholders in this battle, such as social media users, journalists, and policymakers. As our studies have demonstrated, the expected impact of online solutions is hampered by limitations associated with lack of explainability, complex user interface, limited datasets, restricted accessibility, biased algorithms, among others factors that can confuse, overwhelm, or mislead users in their own ways. These ethical implications are typically neglected when new digital solutions to tackle misinformation are conceived. This hands-on workshop proposes to unpack the state-of-the-art on social, societal and political studies and socio-technical solutions to stop misinformation, challenging the participants to first critically reflect upon limitations of existing approaches, to then co-create a future with integrating perspectives focusing on ethical aspects and societal impact.

 

Organizers:

Lara Schibelsky Codoy Piccolo, The Open University UK
Diotima Bertel, SYNYO GmbH
Tracie Farrell, The Open University UK
Pinelopi Troullinou, Trilateral Research

 


 

W11: Body as Starting Point 4: Inbodied Interaction Design for Health Ownership

 

Only Session: 7 May JST 2200 - 8 May JST 0200 / 7 May EDT 0900-1300 / 7 May CEST 1500-1900

 

This fourth Body as a Starting Point workshop investigates how to design interactive health technologies that assist users in developing insourcing abilities and then assist users in letting go of the same technology—in other words, supporting a transition from health technology dependence to independence. By making explicit two inbodied design continua of (1) ownership, from “outsourcing” to “insourcing” and (2) engagement period, from “single”, to” cycle”, to “permanent”, to prototype and reflect on interactive technology that takes the body as a starting point.

 

Organizers:

m.c. schraefel, University of Southampton
Josh Andres, IBM Research Australia
Aaron Tabor, University of New Brunswick
Michael Jones, Brigham Young U.
Wanyu Liu, IRCAM Centre Pompidou
Kai Kunze, Keio University
Elizabeth L Murnane, Dartmouth College
Steeven villa, LMU Munich

 


 

W12: Artificially Intelligent Technology for the Margins: A Multidisciplinary Design Agenda

 

Only Session: 7 May JST 2200 - 8 May JST 0200 / 7 May EDT 0900-1300 / 7 May CEST 1500-1900

 

There has been increasing interest in socially just use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) in the development of technology that may be extended to marginalized people. However, the exploration of such technologies entails the development of an understanding of how they may increase and/or counter marginalization. The use of AI/ML algorithms can lead to several challenges, such as privacy and security concerns, biases, unfairness, and lack of cultural awareness, which especially affect marginalized people. This workshop will provide a forum to share experiences and challenges of developing AI/ML health and social wellbeing technologies with/for marginalized people and will work towards developing design methods to engage in the re-envisioning of AI/ML technologies for and with marginalized people. In doing so we will create cross-research area dialogues and collaborations. These discussions build a basis to (1) explore potential tools to support designing AI/ML systems with marginalized people, and (2) develop a design agenda for future research and AI/ML technology for and with marginalized people.

 

Organizers:

Franziska Tachtler, TU Wien
Konstantin Aal, University of Siegen
Tanja Ertl, University of Siegen
Daniel Diethei, University of Bremen
Jasmine Niess, University of Bremen
Mohammed Khwaja, Telefonica Innovacion Alpha; Imperial College London
Reem Talhouk, Northumbria University
Giovanna Nunes Vilaza, Danish Technical University DTU
Shaimaa Lazem, City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications
Aneesha Singh, University College London
Marguerite Barry, University College Dublin
Volker Wulf, Institute of Information Systems and New Media
Geraldine Fitzpatrick, TU Wien

 


 

W13: Evaluating User Experienced in Mixed Reality

 

First Session: 7 May JST 2200 - 8 May JST 0200 / 7 May EDT 0900-1300 / 7 May CEST 1500-1900
Second Session: 8 May JST 2200 - 9 May JST 0200 / 8 May EDT 0900-1300 / 8 May CEST 1500-1900

 

Measuring user experience in MR (i.e., AR/VR) user studies is essential. Researchers apply a wide range of measuring methods using objective (e.g., biosignals, time logging), behavioral (e.g., gaze direction, movement amplitude), and subjective (e.g., standardized questionnaires) metrics. Many of these measurement instruments were adapted from use-cases outside ofvMR, but have not been validated for usage in MR experiments. However, researchers are faced with various challenges and design alternatives when measuring immersive experiences. These challenges become even more diverse when running out-of-the lab studies. Measurement methods of VR experience received recently much attention. For example, research has started embedding questionnaires in the VE for various applications, as this allows users to stay closer to the ongoing experience while filling out the survey. However, there is a diversity in the interaction methods and practices on how the assessment procedure is conducted. This diversity in methods underlines a missing shared agreement of standardized measurement tools for VR experiences. AR research strongly orients on the research methods from VR, e.g., using the same type of subjective questionnaires. However, there are some crucial technical differences that require deliberate considerations during the evaluation. This workshop at CHI 2021 provides a foundation to exchange expertise and to address challenges as well as opportunities of research methods in MR user studies. By this, our workshop launches a discussion of research methods that should lead to standardizing assessment methods in MR user studies. The outcomes of the workshop will be aggregated into a collective special issue journal article.

 

Organizers:

Dmitry Alexandrovsky, University of Bremen
Susanne Putze, University of Bremen
Valentin Schwind, Frankfurt University
Elisa D. Mekler, Aalto University
Jan David Smeddinck, Newcastle University
Denise Kahl, DFKI, Saarland Informatics Campus
Antonio Krüger, DFKI, Saarland Informatics Campus
Rainer Malaka, University of Bremen

 


 

W14: Towards Explainable and Trustworthy Autonomous Physical Systems

 

Only Session: 7 May JST 2200 - 8 May JST 0200 / 7 May EDT 0900-1300 / 7 May CEST 1500-1900

 

The safe deployment of autonomous physical systems in real-world scenarios requires them to be explainable and trustworthy, especially in critical domains. In contrast with 'black-box' systems, explainable and trustworthy autonomous physical systems will lend themselves to easy assessments by system designers and regulators. This promises to pave ways for easy improvements which can lead to enhanced performance, and as well, increased public trust. In this one-day virtual workshop, we aim to gather a globally distributed group of researchers and practitioners to discuss the opportunities and social challenges in the design, implementation, and deployment of explainable and trustworthy autonomous physical systems, especially in a post-pandemic era. Interactions will be fostered through panel discussions and a series of spotlight talks. To ensure lasting impact of the workshop, we will conduct a pre-workshop survey which will examine the public perception of the trustworthiness of autonomous physical systems. Further, we will publish a summary report providing details about the survey as well as identified challenges resulting from the workshop's panel discussions.

 

Organizers:

Daniel Omeiza, University of Oxford
Oana-Maria Camburu, University of Oxford
Sule Anjomshoae, Umeå University
Lars Kunze, University of Oxford
Konrad Kollnig, University of Oxford
Kary Främling, Umeå University

 


 

W15: Automation Experience in the Workplace

 

Only Session: 7 May JST 2200 - 8 May JST 0200 / 7 May EDT 0900-1300 / 7 May CEST 1500-1900

 

Automation is transforming traditional workplaces and work processes tremendously. While automated systems are no longer restricted to manufacturing environments but pervade various work domains in manifold appearances, automation initiatives and research are still driven from a technology and performance perspective. The goal of this workshop is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for automation-focused user experience research. It will bring together researchers and practitioners from different disciplines to create and transfer knowledge on automation experiences of skilled workers and professionals at workplaces across domains. In a keynote talk, participant presentations, and the group-wise drafting of research ideas, the workshop will address three recent main challenges: encountering workplace automation, collaborating as well as building meaningful relationships with workplace automation. The outcome of this workshop will be a research agenda consisting of ideas for promising future research on automation experiences at the workplace.

 

Organizers:

Matthias Baldauf, Eastern Switzerland University of Applied Sciences
Peter Fröhlich, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology
Shadan Sadeghian, University of Siegen
Philippe Palanque, University Toulouse III
Virpi Roto, Aalto University
Wendy Ju, Cornell Tech
Lynne Baillie, Heriot-Watt University
Manfred Tscheligi, University of Salzburg & AIT

 


 

W16: Empathic Interactions in Automated Vehicles #EmpathicCHI

 

Only Session: 7 May JST 2200 - 8 May JST 0200 / 7 May EDT 0900-1300 / 7 May CEST 1500-1900

 

Automation in driving will change the role of the drivers from actor to passive supervisor. Although the vehicle will be responsible for driving manoeuvres, drivers will need to rely on automation and understand its decisions to establish a trusting relationship between them and the vehicle. Progress has been made in conversational agents and affective machines recently. Moreover, it seems to be promising in this establishment of trust between humans and machines. We believe it is essential to investigate the use of emotional conversational agents in the automotive context to build a solid relationship between the driver and the vehicle. In this workshop, we aim at gathering researchers and industry practitioners from different fields of HCI, ML/AI, NLU and psychology to brainstorm about affective machines, empathy and conversational agent with a particular focus on human-vehicle interaction. Questions like "What would be the specificities of a multimodal and empathic agent in a car?", "How the agent could make the driver aware of the situation?" and "How to measure the trust between the user and the autonomous vehicle?" will be addressed in this workshop.

 

Organizers:

Karl Daher, HES-SO University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland
Marine Capallera, HES-SO University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland
Chiara Lucifora, University of Messina
Jacky Casas, HES-SO University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland
Quentin Meteier, HES-SO University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland
Mira El Kamali, HES-SO University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland
Abdallah Al Ali, Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI)
Giorgio Mario Grosso, University of Messina
Gérard Chollet, CNRS-SAMOVA
Omar Abou Khaled, HES-SO University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland
Elena Mugellini, HES-SO University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland

 


 

W17: In Search of the Alternative Future: Developing Participatory Digital Citizenship to Address the Crisis of Democracy

 

First Session: 7 May JST 2200 - 8 May JST 0200 / 7 May EDT 0900-1300 / 7 May CEST 1500-1900
Second Session: 8 May JST 2200 - 9 May JST 0200 / 8 May EDT 0900-1300 / 8 May CEST 1500-1900

 

In this workshop, we strive to formulate a working definition of a participatory digital citizenship, and to share issues, challenges, opportunities, methods and empirical examples pertaining to participatory digital citizenship as a goal. The rational for such a work lies in extensive digitalization of everyday life, which has turned data into valuable capital and a means of manipulation. Excessively datafied environments and more and more powerful algorithms and artificial intelligences used for processing data pose a threat to societies' democratic arrangements and principles. Our goal is to explore the possibilities and limitations of expanding the concept of digital citizenship towards a direction that addresses the deep power asymmetry existing between the ones that use data and ones that are monitored.

 

Organizers:

Johanna Ylipulli, Aalto University
Aale Luusua, University of Oulu

 


 

W18: Adaptive Accessible AR/VR Systems

 

First Session: 7 May JST 2200 - 8 May JST 0200 / 7 May EDT 0900-1300 / 7 May CEST 1500-1900
Second Session: 8 May JST 2200 - 9 May JST 0200 / 8 May EDT 0900-1300 / 8 May CEST 1500-1900
Third Session: 9 May JST 2200 - 10 May JST 0200 / 9 May EDT 0900-1300 / 9 May CEST 1500-1900

 

Augmented, virtual and mixed reality technologies offer new ways of interacting with digital media. However, such technologies are not well explored for people with different ranges of abilities beyond a few specific navigation and gaming applications. While new standardization activities are investigating accessibility issues with existing AR/VR systems, commercial systems are still confined to specialized hardware and software limiting their widespread adoption among people with disabilities as well as seniors. This proposal takes a novel approach by exploring the application of user model-based personalization for AR/VR systems to improve accessibility. The workshop will be organized by experienced researchers in the field of human computer interaction, robotics control, assistive technology, and AR/VR systems, and will consist of peer reviewed papers and hands-on demonstrations. Keynote speeches and demonstrations will cover latest accessibility research at Microsoft, Google, Verizon and leading universities.

 

Organizers:

Pradipta Biswas, Indian Institute of Science
Pilar Orero, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Manohar Swaminathan, Microsoft Research
Kavita Krishnaswamy, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Peter Robinson, University of Cambridge

 


 

W19: Human Augmentation for Skill Acquisition and Skill Transfer

 

First Session: 8 May JST 1300-1700 / 8 May EDT 0000-0400 / 8 May CEST 0600-1000
Second Session: 9 May JST 1300-1700 / 9 May EDT 0000-0400 / 9 May CEST 0600-1000

 

Human augmentation or augmented humans is regarded as an important research field with a view to the future society in which computer technology such as Virtual and Augmented Reality, Artificial Intelligence, Computer Vision, Robotics, etc. are highly integrated. Human augmentation is not just a research to make human much stronger. It should be used to assist people's daily activities. For example, it can be used to teach sports or musical performances more effectively. It can be used even for assisting people with disabilities. This workshop is expecting novel research results or late breaking results on designs, methods, implementations, or applications to augment or enhance human ability, in physical and intellectual, by using advanced technologies of VR/AR, AI, CV, and Robotics.

 

Organizers:

Hideki Koike, Tokyo Institute of Technology
Jun Rekimoto, The University of Tokyo
Junichi Ushiba, Keio University
Shinichi Furuya, Sony Computer Science Laboratories Inc.
Asa Ito, Tokyo Institute of Technology

 


 

W20: Operationalizing Human-Centered Perspectives in Explainable AI

 

First Session: 8 May JST 2200 - 9 May JST 0200 / 8 May EDT 0900-1300 / 8 May CEST 1500-1900
Second Session: 9 May JST 2200 - 10 May JST 0200 / 9 May EDT 0900-1300 / 9 May CEST 1500-1900

 

The realm of Artificial Intelligence (AI)'s impact on our lives is far reaching -- with AI systems proliferating high-stakes domains such as healthcare, finance, mobility, law, etc., these systems must be able to explain their decision to diverse end-users comprehensibly.
Yet the discourse of Explainable AI (XAI) has been predominantly focused on algorithm-centered approaches, suffering from gaps in meeting user needs and exacerbating issues of algorithmic opacity. To address these issues, researchers have called for human-centered approaches to XAI. There is a need to chart the domain and shape the discourse of XAI with reflective discussions from diverse stakeholders. The goal of this workshop is to examine how human-centered perspectives in XAI can be operationalized at the conceptual, methodological, and technical levels. Encouraging holistic (historical, sociological, and technical) approaches, we put an emphasis on "operationalizing", aiming to produce actionable frameworks, transferable evaluation methods, concrete design guidelines, and articulate a coordinated research agenda for XAI.

 

Organizers:

Upol Ehsan, Georgia Institute of Technology
Philipp Wintersberger, Technische Hochschule Ingolstadt
Q. Vera Liao, IBM Research
Martina Mara, Johannes Kepler University Linz
Marc Streit, Johannes Kepler University Linz
Sandra Wachter, University of Oxford
Andreas Riener, Technische Hochschule Ingolstadt
Mark Riedl, Georgia Tech

 


 

W21: Consequences, Schmonsequences! Considering the Future as Part of Publication and Peer Review in Computing Research

 

Only Session: 8 May JST 2200 - 9 May JST 0200 / 8 May EDT 0900-1300 / 8 May CEST 1500-1900

 

Research in computing is becoming increasingly concerned with understanding and mitigating unintended consequences of technology developments. However, those concerns are rarely reflected in how we submit, review, and publish our own work. Specifically, in talking about how our new apps, devices, algorithms will change the world, we focus almost exclusively on positive consequences. There have been calls (including from an ACM working group) to require some speculation about negative impacts as part of the peer review process. This workshop will explore how to think about and report potential negative consequences in our papers in a way that's practical, inclusive, and achievable. The aim is to draw on scholarship around creative-yet-grounded speculation about technology futures and to consider how these might be applied to publication and peer review. The workshop aims to inspire the CHI conference and the computing research community to meaningfully consider and act upon the potential negative implications of their work.

 

Organizers:

Miriam Sturdee, Lancaster University
Joseph Lindley, Lancaster University
Conor Linehan, University College Cork
Chris Elsden, University of Edinburgh
Neha Kumar, Georgia Tech
Tawanna R Dillahunt, University of Michigan
Regan L Mandryk, University of Saskatchewan
John Vines, Northumbria University

 


 

W22: SpaceCHI: Designing Human-Computer Interaction System for Space Exploration

 

Only Session: 14 May JST 2200 - 15 May JST 0200 / 14 May EDT 0900-1300 / 14 May CEST 1500-1900

 

Space travel and becoming an interplanetary species have always been part of human's greatest imagination. Research in space exploration helps us advance our knowledge in fundamental sciences, and challenges us to design new technology and create new industries for space. However, keeping a human healthy, happy and productive in space is one of the most challenging aspects of current space programs. Our biological body, which evolved in the earth specific environment, can barely survive by itself in space's extreme conditions with high radiation, low gravity, etc. This is similar for the moons and planets in the solar system that humans plan to visit. Therefore, researchers have been developing different types of human-computer interfaces systems that support humans' physical and mental performance in space. With recent advancements in aerospace engineering, and the democratized access to space through aerospace tech startups such as SpaceX, Blue Origin, etc., space research is becoming more plausible and accessible. Thus, there is an exciting opportunity for researchers in HCI to contribute to the great endeavor of space exploration by designing new types of interactive systems and computer interfaces that can support humans living and working in space and elsewhere in the solar system.

 

Organizers:

Pat Pataranutaporn, MIT
Valentina Sumini, MIT
Sandra Haeuplik-Meusburger, Vienna University of Technology
Susanna Testa, Politecnico di Milano
Melodie Yashar, SJSURF at NASA Ames, Mountain View, California, United States
Marianna Obrist, University College London
Joe Paradiso, MIT
Pattie Maes, MIT
Dorit Donoviel, Translational Research Institute for Space Health

 


 

W23: Migration and Mobility in HCI: Rethinking Boundaries, Methods, and Impact

 

Only Session: 8 May JST 2200 - 9 May JST 0200 / 8 May EDT 0900-1300 / 8 May CEST 1500-1900

 

Research on migration (both internal and external, voluntary and forced) has been an emergent domain in HCI and related disciplines over the past decade. However, as the number of migrants has been increasing over the last two decades, coupled with various growing global affairs, new challenges encountered by diverse types of migrants (e.g. international students, migrant workers) keep arising, and research on mobility gets entangled with many broader social and political issues. Hence, migration can no longer be considered as a 'special case' for some immigrant and refugee communities, but an everyday reality to hundreds of millions of people worldwide and across diverse socio-economic groups. Therefore, the objectives of this workshop are to (a) build a community with HCI researchers and practitioners involved in different domains, within and beyond migration, to share ideas and exchange expertise, (b) broaden the scope of HCI migration research and identify gaps within this field, and (c) provide a safe space for critical reflection on methodological approaches, research infrastructure, and space boundaries in relation with migration to achieve a better real-world impact.

 

Organizers:

Dina Sabie, University of Toronto
Reem Talhouk, Northumbria University
Cansu E. Dedeoglu, University of Toronto
Carleen Maitland, Pennsylvania State University
Volker Wulf, Institute of Information Systems and New Media
Eiad Yafi, University Kuala Lumpur
Samar Sabie, Cornell University
Asam Almohamed, Queensland University of Technology
Safa'a AbuJarour, University of Potsdam
Kahina Le Louvier, Northumbria University
Faheem Hussain, Arizona State University
Syed Ishtiaque Ahmed, University of Toronto

 


 

W24: Let's Talk About CUIs: Putting Conversational User Interface Design Into Practice

 

Only Session: 8 May JST 2200 - 9 May JST 0200 / 8 May EDT 0900-1300 / 8 May CEST 1500-1900

 

As CUIs become more prevalent in both academic research and the commercial market, it becomes more essential to design usable and adoptable CUIs. Though research on the usability and design of CUIs has been growing greatly over the past decade, we see that many usability issues are still prevalent in current conversational voice interfaces, from issues in feedback and visibility, to learnability, to error correction, and more. These issues still exist in the most current conversational interfaces in the commercial market, like theGoogle Assistant, Amazon Alexa, and Siri. The aim of this workshop therefore is to bring both academics and industry practitioners together to bridge the gaps of knowledge in regards to the tools, practices, and methods used in the design of CUIs. This workshop will bring together both the research performed by academics in the field, and the practical experience and needs from industry practitioners, in order to have deeper discussions about the resources that require more research and development, in order to build better and more usable CUIs.

 

Organizers:

Christine Murad, University of Toronto
Cosmin Munteanu, University of Toronto Mississauga
Benjamin R. Cowan, University College Dublin
Leigh Clark, Swansea University
Martin Porcheron, Swansea University
Heloisa Candello, IBM Research
Stephan Schlögl, MCI Management Center Innsbruck
Matthew Peter Aylett, CereProc Ltd.
Jaisie Sin, University of Toronto
Bob Moore, IBM Research
Grace Hughes, Accenture Fjord
Andrew Ku, Google

 


 

W25: Reinforcement Learning for Humans, Computers, and Interaction

 

Only Session: 8 May JST 2200 - 9 May JST 0200 / 8 May EDT 0900-1300 / 8 May CEST 1500-1900

 

Reinforcement learning (RL) is emerging as an approach to understand intelligence in both humans and machines. However, if RL is to have a meaningful impact in human--computer interaction, it is critical that these two threads are integrated. This is required for genuinely interactive RL-based systems which take into account user capacities and preferences. This workshop will build a community and form a research agenda for investigating RL in HCI.

 

Organizers:

Dorota Glowacka, University of Helsinki
Andrew Howes, Aalto University
Jussi Jokinen, Aalto University; University of Helsinki
Antti Oulasvirta, Aalto University
Ozgur Simsek, University of Bath

 


 

W26: The Future of Human-Food Interaction

 

Only Session: 8 May JST 2200 - 9 May JST 0200 / 8 May EDT 0900-1300 / 8 May CEST 1500-1900

 

There is an increasing interest in food within the HCI discipline, with many interactive prototypes emerging that augment, extend and challenge the various ways people engage with food, ranging from growing plants, cooking ingredients, serving dishes and eating together. Grounding theory is also emerging that in particular draws from embodied interactions, highlighting the need to consider not only instrumental, but also experiential factors specific to human-food interactions. Considering this, we are provided with an opportunity to extend human-food interactions through knowledge gained from designing novel systems emerging through technical advances. This workshop aims to explore the possibility of bringing practitioners, researchers and theorists together to discuss the future of human-food interaction with a particular highlight on the design of experiential aspects of human-food interactions beyond the instrumental. This workshop extends prior community building efforts in this area and hence explicitly invites submissions concerning the empirically-informed knowledge of how technologies can enrich eating experiences. In doing so, people will benefit not only from new technologies around food, but also incorporate the many rich benefits that are associated with eating, especially when eating with others.

 

Organizers:

Jialin Deng, Monash University
Yan Wang, Monash University
Carlos Velasco, BI Norwegian Business School
Ferran Altarriba Bertran, UC Santa Cruz
Rob Comber, Swinburne University of Technology
Marianna Obrist, University College London
Katherine Isbister, UC Santa Cruz
Charles Spence, Oxford
Florian Floyd Mueller, Monash University

 


 

W27: Everyday Proxy Objects for Virtual Reality

 

Only Session: 8 May JST 2200 - 9 May JST 0200 / 8 May EDT 0900-1300 / 8 May CEST 1500-1900

 

Immersive virtual experiences are becoming ubiquitous in our daily lives. Besides visual and auditory feedback, other senses like haptics, smell and taste can enhance immersion in virtual environments. Most solutions presented in the past require specialized hardware to provide appropriate feedback. To mitigate this need, researchers conceptualized approaches leveraging everyday physical objects as proxies instead. Transferring these approaches to varying physical environments and conditions, however, poses significant challenges to a variety of disciplines such as HCI, VR, haptics, tracking, perceptual science, design, etc. This workshop will explore the integration of everyday items for multi-sensory feedback in virtual experiences and sets course for respective future research endeavors. Since the community still seems to lack a cohesive agenda for advancing this domain, the goal of this workshop is to bring together individuals interested in everyday proxy objects to review past work, build a unifying research agenda, share ongoing work, and encourage collaboration.

 

Organizers:

Florian Daiber, DFKI, Saarland Informatics Campus
Donald Degraen, DFKI, Saarland Informatics Campus
André Zenner, DFKI, Saarland Informatics Campus
Tanja Döring, University of Bremen
Frank Steinicke, Universität Hamburg
Oscar Javier Ariza Nunez, Universität Hamburg
Adalberto L. Simeone, KU Leuven

 


 

W28: What Can CHI Do About Dark Patterns?

 

Only Session: 8 May JST 2200 - 9 May JST 0200 / 8 May EDT 0900-1300 / 8 May CEST 1500-1900

 

Imagine buying flowers for a loved one. After selecting a bouquet, at checkout you discover that the site sneaked a paid greeting card into your shopping cart. This is an example of a dark pattern, an interface designed to manipulate a user into behavior that goes against their best interests. The notion of dark patterns has fostered a growing critical discussion about which interfaces go too far in exploiting the user. The first aim of this workshop at CHI 2021 is to bring together a transdisciplinary group of design practitioners and researchers to discuss dark patterns across domains. The second aim is to identify actions to address dark patterns from within the design community, which might include e.g., setting industry norms, articulating values during the design process, or incorporating dark patterns into design education curricula. The third aim is to look beyond the design community and consider what changes designers might advocate for via interactions with e.g., consumers, media, and policymakers.

 

Organizers:

Kai Lukoff, University of Washington
Alexis Hiniker, University of Washington
Colin M. Gray, Purdue University
Arunesh Mathur, Princeton University
Shruthi Sai Chivukula, Purdue University

 


 

W29: Esports and High Performance HCI

 

Only Session: 8 May JST 2200 - 9 May JST 0200 / 8 May EDT 0900-1300 / 8 May CEST 1500-1900

 

Competitive esports is a growing worldwide phenomenon now rivaling traditional sports, with over 450 million views and 1 billion US dollars in revenue each year. For comparison, Major League Baseball has 500 million views and $10 billion in revenue, FIFA Soccer 900 million and $1.6 billion. Despite this significant popularity, much of the world remains unaware of esports — and in particular, research on and for esports is still extremely scarce compared to esports' impact and potential. The Esports and High Performance HCI (EHPHCI) workshop will begin addressing that research gap. In esports, athletes compete through the computer interface. Because this interface can make the difference between winning and losing, esports athletes are among the most expert computer interface users in the world, as other athletes are experts in using balls and shoes in traditional sports. The premise of this workshop is that people will apply esports technology broadly, improving performance in a wide range of human activity. The workshop will gather experts in engineering, human factors, psychology, design and the social and health sciences to discuss this deeply multidisciplinary enterprise.

 

Organizers:

Benjamin Watson, NC State University
Josef Spjut, NVIDIA
Joohwan Kim, NVIDIA
Jennifer Listman, Statespace Labs
Sunjun Kim, DGIST
Raphael Wimmer, University of Regensburg
David Putrino, Mt. Sinai Health System
Byungjoo Lee, KAIST

 


 

W30: 2VT: Visions, Technologies, and Visions of Technologies for Understanding Human Scale Spaces

 

Only Session: 8 May JST 2200 - 9 May JST 0200 / 8 May EDT 0900-1300 / 8 May CEST 1500-1900

 

Spatial experience is an important subject in various fields, and in HCI it has been mostly investigated in the urban scale. Research on human scale spaces has focused mostly on the personal meaning or aesthetic and embodied experiences in the space. Further, spatial experience is increasingly topical in envisioning how to build and interact with technologies in our everyday lived environments, particularly in so-called smart cities. This workshop brings researchers and practitioners from diverse fields to collaboratively discover new ways to understand and capture human scale spatial experience and envision its implications to future technological and creative developments in our habitats. Using a speculative design approach, we sketch concrete solutions that could help to better capture critical features of human scale spaces and allow for unique possibilities for aspects such as urban play. As a result, we hope to contribute a road map for future HCI research on human scale spatial experience and its application.

 

Organizers:

Ville Paananen, University of Oulu
Piia Markkanen, University of Oulu
Jonas Oppenlaender, University of Oulu
Lik Hang Lee, KAIST; University of Oulu
Haider Ali Akmal, Lancaster University
Ava Fatah gen. Schieck, University College London
John Dunham, Rochester Institute of Technology
Konstantinos Papangelis, Rochester Institute of Technology
Nicholas James LaLone, University of Nebraska at Omaha
Niels van Berkel, Aalborg University; University College London
Jorge Goncalves, The University of Melbourne
Simo Hosio, University of Oulu

 


 

W31: HCI and Knowledge Graphs

 

Only Session: 8 May JST 2200 - 9 May JST 0200 / 8 May EDT 0900-1300 / 8 May CEST 1500-1900

 

Knowledge Graphs (KG) are gaining in popularity; their ability to merge and connect information from different domains has uncountable applications. Although the technology has been around for a while, user interfaces are still difficult to use and to understand. This workshop aims at bringing HCI and KG communities together to discuss how HCI methods could help identify and overcome the issues that keep KG from better user interfaces. It will start with keynotes and position papers, to cover different viewpoints, and will continue in an interactive session with challenges, to bring participants to work together. Expected outcomes are a list of key issues to be addressed by the HCI community and take-away tips and tricks that can be used by the KG communities to develop interfaces and visualization compliant with HCI methodologies. We hope it will be the start of cross-communities collaborations.

 

Organizers:

Marie Destandau, Univ. Paris-Saclay, CNRS, INRIA, Université Paris-Saclay
Ilaria Liccardi, MIT
Ruben Verborgh, Ghent University
Marco Winckler, Université Nice Sophia Antipolis

 


 

W32: Workshop on Technologies to Support Critical Thinking in an Age of Misinformation

 

First Session: 8 May JST 2200 - 9 May JST 0200 / 8 May EDT 0900-1300 / 8 May CEST 1500-1900
Second Session: 9 May JST 1300-1700 / 9 May EDT 0000-0400 / 9 May CEST 0600-1000

 

Serious concerns have been raised about social media's and online news outlets' contribution to a pandemic of misinformation. The sheer volume and tendency of misinformation to exploit people's cognitive biases have eroded the public's trust in media outlets, governmental institutions, and the democratic process. With Human-Computer Interaction being at the forefront of designing and developing user-facing computing systems, we bear special opportunities to address these issues and work on solutions to mitigate problems arising from misinformation. This workshop brings together designers, developers, and thinkers across disciplines to redefine computing systems by focusing on technologies and applications that instil and nurture critical thinking in their users. By focusing on the problem of misinformation and users' cognitive security, this workshop will sketch out blueprints for systems and interfaces that contribute to advancing technology and media literacy, building critical thinking skills, and helping users telling fake from truth.

 

Organizers:

Tilman Dingler, University of Melbourne
Benjamin Tag, University of Melbourne
Philipp Lorenz-Spreen, Max Planck Institute
Andrew W. Vargo, Osaka Prefecture University
Simon Knight, University of Technology Sydney
Stephan Lewandowsky, University of Bristol

 


 

W33: Decolonizing HCI Across Borders

 

First Session: 8 May JST 2200 - 9 May JST 0200 / 8 May EDT 0900-1300 / 8 May CEST 1500-1900
Second Session: 15 May JST 2200 - 16 May JST 0200 / 15 May EDT 0900-1300 / 15 May CEST 1500-1900

 

The HCI Across Borders (HCIxB) community has been growing in recent years, starting with the Development Consortium at CHI 2016 and the HCIxB Symposia at CHI 2017, 2018, and 2019. This year, we propose an HCIxB symposium that continues to foster scholarship potential of early-career HCIxB researchers across the world, particularly those from and in the Global South, engaging on the topic of decoloniality. Through this symposium, we aim to create the space for discussions that have been emerging in pockets of the HCI community but could benefit from greater attention in the interest of demarginalizing members and research areas of the community that have thus far been on the margins of HCI. We expect this virtual workshop at CHI 2021 to be the inaugural session for a series of virtual events to continue this conversation on decolonizing HCI's borders into individual subgroups.

 

Organizers:

Vikram Kamath Cannanure, Carnegie Mellon University
Dilrukshi Gamage, University of Moratuwa
Christian Sturm, Hamm-Lippstadt University of Applied Sciences
Heike Winschiers-Theophilus, Namibia University of Science and Technology
Juan F. Maestre, Indiana University Bloomington
Naveena Karusala, University of Washington
Pedro Reynolds-Cuéllar, MIT
Neha Kumar, Georgia Tech

 


 

W34: Cycling@CHI: Towards a Research Agenda for HCI in the Bike Lane

 

First Session: 8 May JST 2200 - 9 May JST 0200 / 8 May EDT 0900-1300 / 8 May CEST 1500-1900
Second Session: 9 May JST 2200 - 10 May JST 0200 / 9 May EDT 0900-1300 / 9 May CEST 1500-1900

 

In this workshop, we will explore and discuss future developments in mobile user-interfaces for cyclists and users of similar interfaces or services. We highlight the challenge of balancing safety and ecological validity in experiments, and how novel and improved evaluation methods can improve the current situation. We aim to bring together researchers with a strong background in designing and evaluating novel user interfaces in the domain of bicycles and mobility, as well as practitioners who build consumer products in that domain. The workshop's goal is to explore novel ways of designing and evaluating user interfaces for cyclists and similar users when it comes to interacting with mobile devices and services on the ride.

 

Organizers:

Gian-Luca Savino, University of Bremen
Tamara von Sawitzky, Technische Hochschule Ingolstadt
Andrii Matviienko, Technical University of Darmstadt
Miriam Sturdee, Lancaster University
Paweł W. Woźniak, Utrecht University
Markus Löchtefeld, Aalborg University
Andrew L Kun, University of New Hampshire
Andreas Riener, Technische Hochschule Ingolstadt
Jonna Häkkilä, University of Lapland

 


 

W35: Realizing AI in Healthcare: Challenges Appearing in the Wild

 

First Session: 8 May JST 2200 - 9 May JST 0200 / 8 May EDT 0900-1300 / 8 May CEST 1500-1900
Second Session: 9 May JST 2200 - 10 May JST 0200 / 9 May EDT 0900-1300 / 9 May CEST 1500-1900

 

The last several years have shown a strong growth of Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies with promising results for many areas of healthcare. HCI has contributed to these discussions, mainly with studies on explainability of advanced algorithms. However, there are only few AI-systems based on machine learning algorithms that make it to the real world and everyday care. This challenging move has been named the “last mile” of AI in healthcare, emphasizing the sociotechnical uncertainties and unforeseen learnings from involving users in the design or use of AI-based systems. The aim of this workshop is to set the stage for a new wave of HCI research that accounts for and begins to develop new insights, concepts, and methods, for transitioning from development to implementation and use of AI in healthcare. Participants are invited to collaboratively define an HCI research agenda focused on healthcare AI in the wild, which will require examining end-user engagements and questioning underlying concepts of AI in healthcare.

 

Organizers:

Tariq Osman, University of Copenhagen; Vital Beats
Francisco Nunes, Fraunhofer Portugal AICOS
Lauren Wilcox, Google; Georgia Tech
Elizabeth Kaziunas, New York University
Stina Matthiesen, University of Copenhagen
Farah Magrabi, Macquarie University

 


 

W36: Co-designing Resources for Ethics Education in HCI

 

Only Session: 9 May JST 0600-1000 / 8 May EDT 1700-2100 / 8 May CEST 2300 - 9 May CET 0300

 

Due to the evolving nature of technology and its impact on individuals, communities and society, practitioners and designers in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) are expected to consider ethics in their work. This role has inspired the development of a number of resources for practice, such as tools, frameworks and methods to tackle ethical issues in HCI. But these suffer from low adoption rate potentially because they are not yet part of the standard body of knowledge. To mitigate the issue, we argue that there is an urgent need for ethics education in HCI. Beyond defining ethics, an ethics curriculum must enable practitioners to reflect and allow consideration of intended and unintended consequences of the technologies they create from the ground up, rather than as a fix or an afterthought. In this co-design workshop, we aim to build upon existing practices and knowledge of ethics in HCI and work with the CHI community to enrich ethics curriculum. We will scaffold our collective understandings of the existing resources and create guidelines that support interactive educational experiences to support HCI ethics curriculum.

 

Organizers:

Ajit G. Pillai, The University of Sydney
A. Baki Kocaballi, University of Technology Sydney
Tuck Wah Leong, UTS
Rafael A. Calvo, Imperial College London
Nassim Parvin, Georgia Institute of Technology
Katie Shilton, University of Maryland, College Park
Jenny Waycott, The University of Melbourne
Casey Fiesler, University of Colorado Boulder
John C. Havens, IEEE
Naseem Ahmadpour, The University of Sydney

 


 

W37: Designing Interactions for the Ageing Populations -- Addressing Global Challenges

 

First Session: 9 May JST 0600-1000 / 8 May EDT 1700-2100 / 8 May CEST 2300 - 9 May CET 0300
Second Session: 9 May JST 2200 - 10 May JST 0200 / 9 May EDT 0900-1300 / 9 May CEST 1500-1900

 

We are concurrently witnessing two significant shifts: digital devices are becoming ubiquitous, and older people are becoming a very large demographic group. However, despite the recent increase in related CHI publications, older adults continue to be underrepresented in HCI research as well as commercially. Therefore, the overarching aim of this workshop is to increase the momentum for such research within CHI and related fields such as gerontechnology. For this, we plan to continue developing a space to discuss and share principles and strategies to design interactions and evaluate user interfaces (UI) for the ageing population. We thus welcome contributions of proposing improved empirical studies, theories, design and evaluation of UIs for older adults. Building on the success of the last three years' workshops, we aim to grow the community of CHI researchers across borders interested in this topic by fostering a space to exchange results, methods, approaches, and ideas from research on interactive applications in support of older adults that are reflective of international diversity.

 

Organizers:

Sayan Sarcar, University of Tsukuba
Cosmin Munteanu, University of Toronto Mississauga
Neil H Charness, Florida State University
Jussi Jokinen, Aalto University
Xiangshi Ren, Kochi University
Emma Nicol, University of Strathclyde

 


 

W38: User Experience for Multi-Device Ecosystems: Challenges and Opportunities

 

Only Session: 9 May JST 1300-1700 / 9 May EDT 0000-0400 / 9 May CEST 0600-1000

 

Smart devices have pervaded every aspect of humans' daily lives. Though single device UX products are relatively successful, the experience of cross-device interaction is still far from satisfactory and can be a source of frustration. Inconsistent UI styles, unclear coordination, varying fidelity, pairwise interactions, lack of understanding intent, limited data sharing and security, and other problems typically degrade the experience in a multi-device ecosystem. Redesigning the UX, tailored to multi-device ecosystems to enhance the user experience, turns out to be challenging but at the same time affording many new opportunities. This workshop brings together researchers, practitioners and developers with different backgrounds, including from fields such as computationally design, affective computing, and multimodal interaction to exchange views, share ideas, and explore future directions on UX for distributed scenarios, especially for those heterogeneous cross-device ecosystems. The topics cover but are not limited to distributed UX design, accessibility, cross-device HCI, human factors in distributed scenarios, user-centric interfaces, and multi-device ecosystems.

 

Organizers:

Ru Zhang, Huawei Device Co. Ltd.
Yuanchun Shi, Tsinghua University
Bjorn Schuller, Imperial College London; University of Augsburg
Elisabeth Andre, Augsburg University
Sharon Oviatt, Monash University
Aaron J Quigley, UNSW
Nicolai Marquardt, University College London
Ilhan Aslan, German Research Center, Huawei
Ran Ju, Huawei Device Co. Ltd.

 


 

W39: From the Margins to the Centre: Defining New Mission and Vision for HCI Research in South Asia

 

Only Session: 9 May JST 1300-1700 / 9 May EDT 0000-0400 / 9 May CEST 0600-1000

 

The past two decades have seen an increase in the amount of research in the CHI community from South Asia with a focus on designing for the unique and diverse socio-cultural, political, infrastructural, and geographical background of the region. However, the studies presented to the CHI community primarily focus on working with and unpacking the regional contextual constraints (of the users and the infrastructures), thus taking a developmental stance. In this online workshop, we aim to broaden the perspective of the CHI research and community towards the contributions from the region including and beyond development, by bringing together researchers, designers, and practitioners working or are interested in working within these regions on diverse topics such as universal education, global healthcare, accessibility, sustainability, and more. Through the workshop discussion, group design activity, and brainstorming, we aim to provide a space for symbiotic knowledge sharing, and defining shared visions and missions for HCI activities in South Asia for including and moving beyond the development agenda.

 

Organizers:

Pranjal Jain, TheUXWhale; Srishti Institute of Art, Design, and Technology
Samia Ibtasam, University of Washington
Sumita Sharma, University of Oulu
Nilavra Bhattacharya, University of Texas at Austin
Anupriya Tuli, IIIT-Delhi
Dilrukshi Gamage, University of Moratuwa
Dhruv Jain, University of Washington
Rucha Tulaskar, Tampere University
Priyank Chandra, University of Toronto
Lubna Razaq, Information Technology University
Rahat Jahangir Rony, North South University
Deepak Ranjan Padhi, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay
Mohit Jain, Microsoft Research
Suleman Shahid, Lahore University of Management Science
Nova Ahmed, North South University
Devanju Balkrishan, JK Lakshmipat University
Pushpendra Singh, IIIT Delhi

 


 

W40: Human-Data Interaction through Design

 

Only Session: 9 May JST 2200 - 10 May JST 0200 / 9 May EDT 0900-1300 / 9 May CEST 1500-1900

 

The increasing use of personal data and AI in everyday technologies has resulted in the amplification of complex and intertwined socio-technical challenges. These, often exemplified by data abuse, breaches, and exploitation, must be alleviated to support sustainable, resilient and human-centred data economies and positive global innovation. Here, we turn towards Human-Data Interaction, an interdisciplinary branch of research, inspired by HCI, that brings together diverse siloed perspectives to present three holistic response principles: data legibility, negotiability and agency. But, the emergent nature of this field calls for refinement of these theoretical tenets to help them translate into practical and tangible responses that are embedded in the technologies we create. We propose this workshop as a foundational step towards this agenda by opening these principles to the CHI community to encourage critique and dialogue about the strengths, weaknesses, value and opportunities of incorporating HDI into the design and evaluation of technology. The outcomes of this workshop, by engaging with HDI through Design, will form the basis for the next stages of research within HDI by contributing to foundational texts within academia and implementing HDI-infused systems within industry.

 

Organizers:

Neelima Sailaja, University of Nottingham
Joseph Lindley, Lancaster University
Lachlan D Urquhart, University of Edinburgh
Derek McAuley, University of Nottingham
Ian Forrester, BBC R&D

 


 

W41: MEEC: Second Workshop on Momentary Emotion Elicitation and Capture

 

Only Session: 9 May JST 2200 - 10 May JST 0200 / 9 May EDT 0900-1300 / 9 May CEST 1500-1900

 

Recognizing human emotions and responding appropriately has the potential to radically change the way we interact with technology. However, to train machines to sensibly detect and recognize human emotions, we need valid emotion ground truths. A fundamental challenge here is the momentary emotion elicitation and capture (MEEC) from individuals continuously and in real-time, without adversely affecting user experience nor breaching ethical standards. In this virtual half-day CHI 2021 workshop, we will (1) have participant talks and an inspirational keynote presentation (2) ideate elicitation, sensing, and annotation techniques (3) create mappings of when to apply an elicitation method.

 

Organizers:

Abdallah El Ali, Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI)
Monica Perusquia-Hernandez, NTT
Mariam Hassib, Bundeswehr University of Munich
Yomna Abdelrahman, Bundeswehr University of Munich
Joshua Newn, The University of Melbourne

 


 

W42: "This Seems to Work": Designing Technological Systems with the Algorithmic Imaginations of Those Who Labor

 

First Session: 9 May JST 2200 - 10 May JST 0200 / 9 May EDT 0900-1300 / 9 May CEST 1500-1900
Second Session: 14 May JST 2200 - 15 May JST 0200 / 14 May EDT 0900-1300 / 14 May CEST 1500-1900

 

Algorithmically mediated systems and tools are used by workers across the globe. Many of these workers are in low-power positions, where they have little leverage to make demands around transparency, explanation, or terms of use, yet, at the same time rely deeply on these systems for many aspects of their jobs. This tension between little power and high reliance drives the production of intensive algorithmic imaginaries, where workers engage in meaning-making to construct understandings of these systems. Yet, there has been little attention paid to the diversity and ingenuity of algorithmic understandings crafted by the workers. In this workshop, our goal is to bring together researchers and practitioners from across disciplines to create a research agenda, compare vocabularies, and discuss methodologies around this form of “folk tradecraft.” This toolkit will help elicit insights into these phenomena and ultimately build mechanisms by which the labor of algorithmic meaning-making can be respected, understood, and leveraged for system design.

 

Organizers:

Lindsey Cameron, Wharton, U Penn
Angele Christin, Stanford University
Michael Ann DeVito, Northwestern University
Tawanna R Dillahunt, University of Michigan
Madeleine Elish, Google Research
Mary Gray, Microsoft Research
Rita Qadri, MIT
Noopur Raval, NYU
Melissa Valentine, Stanford University
Elizabeth Anne Watkins, Princeton University

 


 

W43: Anticipatory Governance in the Technology Sector: Processes, Critiques, and Principles for Addressing Grand Challenges in Computing

 

Only Session: 14 May JST 2200 - 15 May JST 0200 / 14 May EDT 0900-1300 / 14 May CEST 1500-1900

 

With growing understanding of negative social and environmental impacts of computing technologies and increasingly urgent calls to mitigate these impacts, the sector now faces thorny questions around whether and how to govern computing technologies. This workshop aims to bring together researchers and practitioners across a wide range of disciplines to explore critical perspectives on and solutions to anticipatory governance in the computing sector. We will draw on participants' diverse expertise to develop a practical and ethical governance roadmap that attends to the computing sector's responsibility to mitigate its own contribution to the climate emergency. Having developed strategies within this specific context, we will then produce a set of governance principles that could be useful to mitigate other harms resulting from computing, nominally those pertaining to efforts around responsible AI, data protection, and mis/disinformation.

 

Organizers:

Kelly Widdicks, Lancaster University
Bran Knowles, Lancaster University
Gordon Blair, Lancaster University
Carolyn Ten Holter, University of Oxford
Marina Jirotka, University of Oxford
Federica Lucivero, University of Oxford
Gabrielle Samuel, University of Southampton
Helena Webb, University of Oxford

 


 

W44: EMICS'21: Eye Movements as an Interface to Cognitive State

 

First Session: 14 May JST 2200 - 15 May JST 0200 / 14 May EDT 0900-1300 / 14 May CEST 1500-1900
Second Session: 16 May JST 0600-1000 / 15 May EDT 1700-2100 / 15 May CEST 2300 - 16 May CET 0300

 

Eye movement recording has been extensively used in HCI and offers the possibility to understand how information is perceived and processed by users. Hardware developments provide the ubiquitous accessibility of eye recording, allowing eye movements to enter common usage as a control modality. Recent A.I. developments provide powerful computational means to make predictions about the user. However, the connection between eye movements and cognitive state has been largely under-exploited in HCI. Despite the rich literature in psychology, a deeper understanding of its usability in practice is still required. This virtual EMICS workshop will provide an opportunity to discuss possible application scenarios and HCI interfaces to infer users' mental state from eye movements. It will bring together researchers across disciplines with the goal of expanding shared knowledge, discussing innovative research directions and methods, fostering future collaborations around the use of eye movements as an interface to cognitive state.

 

Organizers:

Xi Wang, TU Berlin
Zoya Bylinskii, Adobe Research
Monica Castelhano, Queen's University
James Hillis, Facebook Reality Labs
Andrew Duchowski, Clemson University

 


 

W45: Rethinking the Senses: A Workshop on Multisensory Embodied Experiences and Disability Interactions

 

First Session: 14 May JST 2200 - 15 May JST 0200 / 14 May EDT 0900-1300 / 14 May CEST 1500-1900
Second Session: 15 May JST 2200 - 16 May JST 0200 / 15 May EDT 0900-1300 / 15 May CEST 1500-1900

 

The emerging possibilities of multisensory interactions provide an exciting space for disability and open up opportunities to explore new experiences for perceiving one's own body, it's interactions with the environment and also to explore the environment itself. In addition, dynamic aspects of living with disability, life transitions, including ageing, psychological distress, long-term conditions such as chronic pain and new conditions such as long-COVID further affect people's abilities. Interactions with this diversity of embodiments can be enriched, empowered and augmented through using multisensory and cross-sensory modalities to create more inclusive technologies and experiences. To explore this, in this workshop we will explore three related sub-domains: immersive multi-sensory experiences, embodied experiences, and disability interactions and design. The aim is to better understand how we can re-think the senses in technology design for disability interactions and the dynamic self, constructed through continuously changing sensing capabilities either because of changing ability or because of the empowering technology. This workshop will: (i) bring together HCI researchers from different areas, (ii) discuss tools, frameworks and methods, and (iii) form a multidisciplinary community to build synergies for further collaboration.

 

Organizers:

Maryam Bandukda, University College London
Aneesha Singh, University College London
Catherine Holloway, University College London
Nadia Berthouze, University College London
Emeline Brulé, University of Sussex
Ana Tajadura-Jiménez, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid; University College London
Oussama Metatla, University of Bristol
Ana Lavornik, Newcastle University Business School
Anja Thieme, Microsoft Research

 


 

W46: Emergent Interaction: Complexity, Dynamics, and Enaction in HCI

 

Only Session: 15 May JST 1300-1700 / 15 May EDT 0000-0400 / 15 May CEST 0600-1000

 

We propose a workshop on methods and theories for dealing with complex dynamical systems, and their application in HCI. Such methods are increasingly relevant across a wide range of disciplines which focus on human behaviour, applied to understand the role of context and interactions in the behaviour of individuals and groups, and how they unfold over time. Traditional approaches to quantifying and modelling behaviour in HCI have tended to focus primarily on individuals and components. Complexity methods shift the focus onto interactions between components, and the emergence of behaviour from complex networks of interactions, as for example in Enactivist approaches to cognitive science. While we believe that complexity methods can be highly informative to HCI researchers, uptake in the community remains low due to widespread unfamiliarity. This one-day workshop will introduce, support, and encourage the development and adoption of complexity methods within HCI. Reflecting the multidisciplinary mix within complexity science, we will draw on examples of complexity-oriented theories and methods from a range of disciplines, including Control-Theory, Social Science, and Cognitive Science. Attendees will engage in group discussions and a Q&A with a panel, and a discussion group will be set up ahead of time to encourage exploratory conversations. In this way, diverse backgrounds can be brought together, matched, and inform one another.

 

Organizers:

Daniel Thomas Bennett, University of Bristol
Alan Dix, Swansea University
Parisa Eslambolchilar, Cardiff University
Feng Feng, University of Bristol
Tom Froese, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University
Vassilis Kostakos, University of Melbourne
Sabastien Lerique, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University
Niels van Berkel, Aalborg University

 


 

W47: Social Media as a Design and Research Site in HCI: Mapping Out Opportunities and Envisioning Future Uses

 

First Session: 15 May JST 1300-1700 / 15 May EDT 0000-0400 / 15 May CEST 0600-1000
Second Session: 16 May JST 1300-1700 / 16 May EDT 0000-0400 / 16 May CEST 0600-1000

 

In this workshop, we will explore the emergent methodological space of social media based HCI design and research. We will gather scholars and practitioners from different areas within HCI to discuss how social media platforms might support their practice. Through short presentations, open discussions, and design-led activities, we will examine the affordances of existing social media platforms and speculate future developments in this methodological space. The outcome of the workshop will be an interactive data visualization of existing social media platforms, their main characteristics, and their affordances for HCI design and research. Overall, we will begin to characterize the methodological space of social media based HCI design and research, setting the foundation for future developments in this space.

 

Organizers:

Ferran Altarriba Bertran, UC Santa Cruz
Soomin Kim, Seoul National University
Minsuk Chang, NAVER AI LAB; KAIST
Ella Dagan, UC Santa Cruz
Jared Duval, UC Santa Cruz
Katherine Isbister, UC Santa Cruz
Laia Turmo Vidal, Uppsala University

 


 

W48: Remote XR Studies: Exploring Three Key Challenges of Remote XR Experimentation

 

Only Session: 15 May JST 2200 - 16 May JST 0200 / 15 May EDT 0900-1300 / 15 May CEST 1500-1900

 

HCI and social science experimentation that explores or uses extended reality (XR) has been particularly impacted by the recent Covid-19 pandemic. This is due to typical deployment of XR experiments inside laboratories, and a paucity of research into how to effectively conduct remote XR experimentation. This first CHI Remote XR workshop aims to explore the current state of the art around three main themes of remote XR experimentation: (i) participant recruitment and screening; (ii) data collection, including limitations and affordances of existing research and XR tools; and (iii) software frameworks and requirements for the effective design of encapsulated remote XR user studies. This workshop brings together researchers and practitioners in XR to explore these recently emerged themes and to imagine how effective future remote XR research might be conducted.

 

Organizers:

Jack Ratcliffe, Queen Mary University of London
Francesco Soave, Queen Mary University of London
Melynda Hoover, Iowa State University
Francisco Raul Ortega, Colorado State University
Nick Bryan-Kinns, Queen Mary University of London
Laurissa Tokarchuk, Queen Mary University of London
Ildar Farkhatdinov, Queen Mary University of London

 


 

W49: EduCHI 2021: 3rd Annual Symposium on HCI Education

 

Only Session: 15 May JST 2200 - 16 May JST 0200 / 15 May EDT 0900-1300 / 15 May CEST 1500-1900

 

The HCI Education Community of Practice (CoP) has grown considerably over the past few years, starting with the HCI Living Curriculum workshop at CHI 2018 and continuing through to the EduCHI symposia at both CHI 2019 and CHI 2020. Central to the growth of the CoP has been two parallel efforts: creating channels to discuss issues pertinent to HCI education and providing a platform for sharing HCI curricula and teaching experiences. To continue this progress, we are organizing EduCHI 2021, the 3rd Annual Symposium on HCI Education. EduCHI 2021 will be held virtually and will feature interactive discussions about HCI education trends, curricula, pedagogies, teaching practices, and current and future challenges facing HCI educators.

 

Organizers:

Craig M. MacDonald, Pratt Institute
Olivier St-Cyr, University of Toronto
Colin M. Gray, Purdue University
Leigh Ellen Potter, Griffith University
Jaisie Sin, University of Toronto
Anna Vasilchenko, Newcastle University
Elizabeth F Churchill, Google

 


 

W50: Do Cyborgs Dream of Electric Limbs? Experiential Factors in Human-Computer Integration Design and Evaluation

 

Only Session: 16 May JST 0600-1000 / 15 May EDT 1700-2100 / 15 May CEST 2300 - 16 May CET 0300

 

While many systems have successfully demonstrated functional integration of humans and technology, little attention has been paid to how technologies might experientially integrate to feel as part of humans. Our aim is to shed light on the importance of experiential integration and provide researchers with a scientifically driven foundation for future designs and investigations. The workshop will consist of hands-on experiments with novel body-illusions, discussions on experiential integration, and instructor-guided sessions on psychological concepts related to the design and evaluation of experiential integration.

 

Organizers:

Valdemar Danry, MIT
Pat Pataranutaporn, MIT
Adam Haar Horowitz, MIT
Paul Strohmeier, Saarland University
Josh Andres, IBM Research Australia; Monash University
Rakesh Patibanda, Monash University
Zhuying Li, Monash University
Takuto Nakamura, Tokyo Institute of Technology
Jun Nishida, University of Chicago
Pedro Lopes, University of Chicago
Felipe León, University of Copenhagen
Andrea Stevenson Won, Cornell University
Dag Svanæs, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Florian Floyd Mueller, Monash University
Pattie Maes, MIT
Sang-won Leigh, Georgia Institute of Technology

 


 

W51: Disability Design and Innovation in Low-Resource Settings: Addressing Inequality through HCI

 

Only Session: 16 May JST 2200 - 17 May JST 0200 / 16 May EDT 0900-1300 / 16 May CEST 1500-1900

 

Approximately 15% of the world's population has a disability and 80% live in low resource-settings, often in situations of severe social isolation. Technology is often inaccessible or inappropriately designed, hence unable to fully respond to the needs of people with disabilities living in low resource settings. Also lack of awareness of technology contributes to limited access. This workshop will be a call to arms for researchers in HCI to engage with people with disabilities in low resourced settings to understand their needs and design technology that is both accessible and culturally appropriate. We will achieve this through sharing of research experiences, and exploration of challenges encountered when planning HCI4D studies featuring participants with disabilities. Thanks to the contributions of all attendees, we will build a roadmap to support researchers aiming to leverage post-colonial and participatory approaches for the development of accessible and empowering technology with truly global ambitions.

 

Organizers:

Giulia Barbareschi, University College London
Dafne Zuleima Morgado-Ramirez, University College London
Catherine Holloway, University College London
Swami Manohar Swaminathan, Microsoft Research
Aditya Vashistha, Cornell University
Edward Cutrell, Microsoft Research

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