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Selecting a Subcommittee

Overview

 

CHI 2021 anticipates more than 3,000 Papers submissions. The review process needs to handle this load while also providing high-quality reviews, which requires that each submission is handled by an expert Associate Chair (AC) who can recruit expert reviewers. The organization of the CHI program committee into topical subcommittees helps achieve this. See the description of the Papers review process for a detailed explanation of the responsibilities of the ACs and Subcommittee Chairs (SCs).

 

Authors should examine what constitutes a contribution to SIGCHI and recognize that there are many different types of contribution possible for a SIGCHI paper.

 

Authors are required to suggest a subcommittee to review your submission. This page provides guidance on choosing the appropriate subcommittees for your submission.

 

List of the subcommittees

 

Fifteen subcommittees are listed and described below. Each has a title, short description, and an indication of who will Chair and serve on the subcommittee and if a subcommittee consists of multiple tracks. Subcommittees have been constructed with an eye to maintaining logically coherent clusters of topics.

 

 

Subcommittee selection process

 

When you submit a Paper, you can designate up to two appropriate subcommittees for your submission. In the vast majority of cases, the subcommittee that will review your submission is one of the two subcommittees that you proposed. In cases where the Papers Chairs and/or Subcommittee Chairs recognize that your submission will be reviewed more thoroughly in another subcommittee, a submission may be transferred from one subcommittee to another. If a submission is transferred to another subcommittee, this will happen in the first week of the process, before reviewers are assigned; i.e., transferring will not affect a submission’s review process, it will only ensure that it receives the most complete, fair set of reviews.

 

Below, you will see a list of subcommittees and descriptions of the topics they are covering, the name of each SC, and the names of the ACs serving on each subcommittee. It is your responsibility to select the subcommittee that best matches the expertise needed to assess your research and that you believe will most fully appreciate your contribution to the field of HCI.

 

CHI has traditionally supported diverse and interdisciplinary work and continues to expand into new topics not previously explored. We recognize that as a result, you may find more than two subcommittees which are plausible matches for your work. However, for a number of reasons, it will be necessary for you to select no more than two target subcommittees, and you should strive to find the best matches based on what you think is the main contribution of your submission (examples of papers that are considered good matches are linked below for each subcommittee). You can also email the SCs for guidance if you are unsure (an email alias is provided below for each set of SCs).

 

Note that the scope of each subcommittee is not rigidly defined. Each has a broad mandate, and most subcommittees cover a collection of different topics. Further, SCs and ACs are all seasoned researchers, experienced with program committee review work, and each is committed to a process which seeks to assign each paper reviewers who are true experts in whatever the subject matter of the paper is. ACs recognize that many papers, or perhaps even most papers, will not perfectly fit the definition of their subcommittee’s scope. Consequently, papers will not be penalized or downgraded because they do not align perfectly with a particular subcommittee. Interdisciplinary, multi-topic, and cross-topic papers are encouraged and will be carefully and professionally judged by all subcommittees.

 

In making a subcommittee choice you should make careful consideration of what the most central and salient contribution of your work is, even if there are several different contributions. As an example, let’s say you are writing a paper about Ergonomic Business Practices for the Elderly using Novel Input Devices. Perhaps this is a very new topic. It covers a lot of ground. It’s not an exact fit for any of the subcommittees, but several choices are plausible. To choose between them, you need to make a reasoned decision about the core contributions of your work. Should it be evaluated in terms of the usage context for the target user community? The novel methodology developed for your study? The system and interaction techniques you have developed? Each of these evaluation criteria may partially apply, but try to consider which is most central and which you most want to highlight for your readers. Also look at the subcommittees, the people who will serve on them, and the kind of work they have been associated with in the past. Even if there are several subcommittees that could offer fair and expert assessments of this work, go with the one that really fits the most important and novel contributions of your paper. That committee will be in the best position to offer constructive and expert review feedback on the contributions of your research.

 

Each subcommittee description also links to several recent CHI papers that the SCs feel are good examples of papers that fit the scope of that subcommittee. Please look at these examples as a way to decide on the best subcommittee for your paper – but remember that these are just a few examples, and do not specify the full range of topics that would fit with any subcommittee.

 

 

User Experience and Usability

 

This subcommittee is suitable for papers that extend the knowledge, practices, methods, components, and tools that make technology more useful, usable, and desirable. Successful papers will present results, practical approaches, tools, technologies, and research methods that demonstrably advance our understanding, design, and evaluation of user experience and/or usability. The focus is on usability and user experience of widely used technologies with contributions being judged substantially on the basis of their demonstrable potential for effective reuse and applicability across a range of application domains or across a range of design, research, and user communities.

 

Sub-committee Chairs

Track A:
  • Magy Seif El-Nasr, Northeastern University
  • Florian Alt, Bundeswehr University Munich
Track B:
  • Keith Vertanen, Michigan Technological University
  • Lynne Baillie, Heriot Watt University
  Contact: sc.ux@chi2021.acm.org

 

Associate Chairs

  • (to come)

 

Example Papers:

 

Specific Applications Areas

This subcommittee is suitable for papers that extend the design and understanding of applications for specific application areas or domains of interest to the HCI community, yet not explicitly covered by another subcommittee. Example application areas and user groups are listed below. Submissions will be evaluated in part based on their impact on the specific application area and/or group that they address, in addition to their impact on HCI.

Example user groups: people in developing countries, charities and third sector organizations, marginal/marginalized population, workers, people with disabilities, non-human stakeholders (such as insects, animals), farmers, children

Example application areas: ICTD, HCI4D, creativity, making and fabrication, home, participatory/participative cultures, rural communities, smart and connected communities, urban informatics, health of marginalized groups, civic engagement, intimate interaction, child-computer interaction, and animal computer interaction.

 

Sub-committee Chairs

  • Brian Bailey, University of Illinois
  • Nicola Bell, Cornell University

 

Contact: sc.apps@chi2021.acm.org

 

Associate Chairs

  • (to come)

 

Example Papers:

 

 

 

Learning, Education, and Families

The “Learning and Education” component of this subcommittee is suitable for contributions that deepen our understanding of how to design, build, deploy, and/or study technologies for learning processes and in educational settings. Topics may include (but are not limited to) intelligent tutoring systems; multimedia interfaces for learning; learning analytics; systems for collaborative learning and social discussion; and tangible learning interfaces. These may be suitable for a variety of settings: online learning, learning at scale; primary, secondary, and higher education; informal learning in museums, libraries, homes, and after-school settings.

The “Families” component of this subcommittee is suitable for contributions that extend design and understanding of how children, parents, and families interact with technology. Topics may include (but are not limited to) a wide range of domains that span health and well-being, social, psychological, and cultural phenomena.

While submissions will be evaluated on their impact on the specific application and/or group that they address, papers must also make a substantial contribution to HCI. In reflecting on their paper’s potential contribution to HCI, authors may wish to examine past proceedings; see the Contributions to CHI page.

This subcommittee is intended to handle many of the papers that went to and were reviewed under a split of Specific Applications Areas in CHI 2018 and earlier.

 

Sub-committee Chairs

  • Betsy DiSalvo, Georgia Tech
  • Erin Walker, University of Pittsburgh

 

Contact: sc.families@chi2021.acm.org

 

Associate Chairs

  • (to come)

 

Example Papers:

 

Interaction Beyond the Individual

This subcommittee is suitable for papers that contribute to our understanding of collaborative technologies for groups, organizations, communities, and networks. Successful submissions will advance knowledge, theories, and insights from the social, psychological, behavioral, and organizational practice that arise from technology use in various contexts. This subcommittee is also suitable for submissions describing  collaborative or crowdsourcing tools or systems.

 

 

Sub-committee Chairs

  • Munmun Chaudhury, Georgia Tech
  • Thomas Ludwig, University of Siegen

 

Contact: sc.cscw@chi2021.acm.org

 

Associate Chairs

  • (to come)

 

Example Papers:

 

Games and Play

This subcommittee is suitable for papers across all areas of playful interaction, player experience, and games. Examples of topics include: game interaction and interfaces, playful systems (e.g., toys, books, leisure), the design and development of games (including serious games and gamification), player experience evaluation (player psychology, games user research, and game analytics), the study of player and developer communities, and understanding play.

 

 

Sub-committee Chairs

  • Kathrin Gerling, KU Leuven
  • Pejman Mirza-Babaei, Ontario Tech University

 

Contact: sc.games@chi2021.acm.org

 

Associate Chairs

  • (to come)

 

Example Papers 

 

Privacy and Security

This subcommittee is suitable for papers relating to privacy and security. This includes but is not limited to: new techniques/systems/technologies, evaluations of existing/new systems, lessons learned from real-world deployments, foundational research identifying important theoretical and/or design insight for the community, etc.

Submissions will be judged based on the contribution they make to privacy and security as well as their impact on HCI. For instance, papers that focus on technical contributions will need to show the relationship of the contribution to humans and user experience.

 

Sub-committee Chairs

  • Apu Kapadia, Indiana University
  • Emilee Rader, Michigan State University

 

Contact: sc.privacy@chi2021.acm.org

 

Associate Chairs

  • (to come)

 

Example Papers:

 

Visualization

The Visualization subcommittee welcomes papers from all areas of data visualization and visual analytics. This includes, but is not limited to, new visualization or interaction techniques/systems/technologies, evaluations of existing or new visualization systems and techniques, groundwork identifying important insights for the community, and lessons learned from real-world deployments. 

Submissions will be judged based on the contribution they make to visualization as well as their impact on HCI. For example, papers that focus on technical contributions need to show how these relate to humans and user experience.

 

Sub-committee Chairs

  • Niklas Elmqvist, University of Maryland
  • Bongshin Lee, Microsoft

 

Contact: sc.viz@chi2021.acm.org

 

Associate Chairs

  • (to come)

 

Example Papers:

 

Health

This subcommittee is suitable for contributions related to health, wellness, and medicine, including physical, mental, and emotional well-being, clinical environments, self-management, and everyday wellness. Accepted papers will balance the rigor required in all CHI submissions with awareness of the challenges of conducting research in these challenging contexts. The research problem can be grounded in both formal and informal health and care contexts. Submissions to this subcommittee will be evaluated in part based on their inclusion of and potential impact on their stakeholders. 
We welcome papers that are empirical, theoretical, conceptual, methodological, design, and systems contributions. Papers must have a clear and novel contribution to HCI in terms of our understanding of people’s interaction with technology in a healthcare context, or the design of health and wellness technologies. For example, systematic reviews or usability studies associated with clinical trials must also have contributions for the HCI community.

 

Sub-committee Chairs

Track A:

  • Xianghua Ding, Fudan University
  • Gavin Doherty, Trinity College Dublin

Track B:

  • Eun Kyoung Choe, University of Maryland
  • Marilyn Lennon, University of Strathclyde

 

Contact: sc.health@chi2021.acm.org

 

Associate Chairs

  • (to come)

 

Example Papers:

 

Accessibility and Aging

This subcommittee is suitable for contributions related to the design or study of technology for people with disabilities and/or older adults. Accessibility papers are those that deal with technology design for or use by people with disabilities including sensory, motor, and cognitive impairments. Aging papers are broadly categorized as those dealing with technology design for or use by people in the later stages of life. Relationships with technology are complex and multifaceted; we welcome contributions across a range of topics aimed at benefiting relevant stakeholder groups and not solely limited to concerns of making technology accessible. Note that if your paper primarily concerns interactions with health data or with healthcare providers, then the Health subcommittee is probably a better fit, whereas papers reflecting on how technologies are used and/or designing interfaces and interactions suited to specific needs are better suited for this subcommittee. We strongly suggest that authors review this Accessible Writing Guide in order to adopt a writing style that refers to stakeholder groups using appropriate terminology. Submissions to this subcommittee will be evaluated in part based on their inclusion of and potential impact on their target user groups and other stakeholders. This subcommittee balances the rigor required in all CHI submissions with awareness of the challenges of conducting research in these important areas. This subcommittee welcomes all contributions related to accessibility, and aging, including empirical, theoretical, conceptual, methodological, design, and systems contributions.

 

Sub-committee Chairs

  • Susanne Boll, University of Oldenburg
  • Cosmin Munteanu, University of Toronto

 

Contact: sc.access@chi2021.acm.org

 

Associate Chairs

  • (to come)

 

Example Papers:

 

Design

This subcommittee is suitable for papers that make a significant designerly contribution to HCI. Papers submitted here include novel designs of interactive products, services, or systems that advance the state of the art; creation and evaluation of new design tools, processes, methods, or principles, including those that explore alternatives to scientistic ways of knowing; work that expands the scope of design thinking within HCI research or practice; work that applies perspectives from other disciplines to inspire or to critique the design of interactive things; or work that advances knowledge on the human activity of design as it relates to HCI research or practice. We particularly encourage contributions of new designs that broaden the boundaries of interaction design and promote new aesthetic and sociocultural possibilities. Examples of design approaches include : industrial/product design, visual/information design, participatory design, user-centered design, interaction design, user interface design, user experience design, service design, critical design, and design fictions. Finally, this committee encourages submission of work that addresses design research issues such as aesthetics, values, effects (such as emotion), methods, practices, critique, constructive design research, and design theory.

 

Sub-committee Chairs

Track A:

  • Kristina Andersen, TU Eindhoven
  • Christopher Le Dantec, Georgia Tech

Track B:

  • Jeffrey Bardzell, Indiana University Bloomington
  • Marianna Obrist, University of Sussex

 

Contact: sc.design@chi2021.acm.org

 

Associate Chairs

  • (to come)

 

Example Papers:

 

Interaction Techniques, Devices, and Modalities

This subcommittee focuses on advances in interaction and enabling technologies as well as explorations of emergent computing domains and experiences. It welcomes contributions that are fundamentally new, those that examine capabilities/modalities that have not yet been fully exploited, and those which describe substantive improvements on prior work that open new interactive possibilities. Contributions will be judged in part based on their novelty or on their demonstrated improvements. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to: software interaction techniques, touch and gestural input, haptic and tangible interfaces, interaction with and around digital fabrication, 3D interaction, augmented/mixed/virtual reality, wearable and on-body computing, sensors and sensing, displays and actuators, muscle- and brain-computer interfaces, and auditory and speech interfaces.

 

Sub-committee Chairs

Track A:

  • Sebastian Boring, Aalborg University Copenhagen
  • Christian Holz, ETH Zurich

Track B:

  • Mike Chen, National Taiwan University
  • Anne Roudaut, University of Bristol

 

Contact: sc.inttech@chi2021.acm.org

 

Associate Chairs

  • (to come)

 

Example Papers:

 

Understanding People: Theory, Concepts, Methods

This subcommittee welcomes submissions whose primary contribution targets an improved understanding of people and/or interactional contexts. This understanding may be derived using quantitative and/or qualitative (or mixed-method) empirical research, or it may be conceptual in nature. Suitable topics for the subcommittee include but are not limited to individual behavior, human performance, as well as group, social, and collaborative behaviors. Core contributions typically take the form of insightful findings, evolved theories, models, concepts, or methods. Submissions may examine technology practices of diverse populations, and unique, understudied cultural, geographic, and socioeconomic contexts. Contributions will be evaluated for their rigor, significance, validity, and practical or theoretical contributions.

 

Sub-committee Chairs

Track A:

  • Gary Hsieh, University of Washington
  • Maria Wolters, University of Edinburgh

Track B:

  • Peter Tolmie, University of Siegen
  • Naomi Yamashita, NTT

Track C:

  • Neha Kumar, Georgia Tech
  • Max Wilson, University of Nottingham

 

Contact: sc.people@chi2021.acm.org

 

Associate Chairs

  • (to come)

 

Example Papers:

 

Engineering Interactive Systems and Technologies

This subcommittee is suitable for papers which present and describe novel interactive systems and technologies, as well as the technical development of resources which will facilitate and inspire future interface design explorations. This includes both software and hardware technologies that enable and demonstrate novel interactive capabilities, and “enabling” contributions, such as datasets, tools, methods, and languages which will directly support the construction, engineering or validation of interactive systems. 

Engineering contributions should clearly explain how they address interactive systems concerns such as scalability, reliability, interoperability, testing, and performance. They can be targeted at end users, offering novel interaction capabilities or supporting improved interactions. They can also be targeted at developers, improving or facilitating the construction of innovative interactive systems. “Enabling” contributions must specify how they can impact HCI research, or how they can support HCI practitioners in the design or implementation of future interactive systems.

 

Sub-committee Chairs

  • Caroline Appert, Laboratoire de Rechereche en Informatique
  • Carl Gutwin, University of Saskatchewan

 

Contact: sc.eist@chi2021.acm.org

 

Associate Chairs

  • (to come)

 

Example Papers:

 

Critical and Sustainable Computing

This subcommittee welcomes HCI research connected to themes of social justice, global sustainability, critical-reflective research practice, artful and aesthetic experiences, and critical computing-—all in pursuit of meaningful alternatives to the status quo. We encourage papers that explore how computing and computing research contributes to fair and just relations between individuals, social groups, and whole societies, locally and globally—all in the pursuit of fulfillment and flourishing. Submissions should feature any combination of one or more of the following:

 

  • Commitments to diversity/inclusion, sustainability, survivance, and social justice
  • Communication of perspectives from marginalized and unheard persons, populations, Nations
  • Challenges to and/or new analyses of received knowledge and paradigms
  • Explications of values and needs from diverse users and their communities
  • Low-energy or zero carbon technologies and ways of life
  • The pursuit of artful experiences and aesthetic ways of being and doing
  • A robust and open politics
  • The prominent use of philosophy and other theory
  • The fostering of empathy, imagination, appreciation, and perception as community values

 

The subcommittee is epistemologically pluralistic, welcoming of a range of perspectives, approaches, and contributions that might take interpretivist, empirical, activist, political, ethical, critical, and/or pragmatic approaches to both societal challenges and how HCI research frames itself in relation to them. As a part of that commitment, we also champion diverse forms of scholarly expression in the CHI community, such as critical essays, research through design, practice-based research, design fictions, and commentaries. 

 

Sub-committee Chairs

  • Shaowen Bardzell, Indiana University Bloomington
  • Rob Comber, Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm

 

Contact: sc.sscc@chi2021.acm.org

 

Associate Chairs

  • (to come)

 

Example papers:

 

 

 

Computational Interaction

This subcommittee invites papers whose primary contribution improves our understanding on how to design interactive systems underpinned by computational principles of human-computer interaction, including applications of such systems. Typical papers study or enhance interaction underpinned by, for instance, machine learning, optimization, statistical modeling, natural language processing, control theory, signal processing and computer vision. Beyond simply applying such methods, they seek new ways to describe, predict, and change interaction and guide the design of interactive systems that rely on computational methods or demonstrate applications of such systems. Core contributions typically take the form of novel theories, methods, techniques, and systems for computational approaches in HCI, as well as reports of rigorous empirical studies of interactive systems supported by computational approaches. Contributions will be judged by their rigor, significance, validity, and practical or theoretical impact. 

Accepted papers contribute to our understanding of computational methods in human use of computing. The subcommittee is not limited to algorithms but welcomes a broad range of contributions, including but not limited to:

 

  • Data set or analysis
  • Empirical study, including replication studies
  • Method
  • Theory and modeling
  • Design
  • Commentary or essay

 

An excellent paper advances knowledge of computational approaches in human-computer interaction. Even in algorithmic contributions, the human viewpoint is central and kept visible throughout. In particular, an excellent paper 1) addresses a well-scoped phenomenon in human use of computers; 2) rigorously introduces and argues for the chosen approach, including assumptions both about humans and the computational approach, as well as differences and similarities with previous work; 3) explicates the claimed contribution in terms of benefit or disadvantage to humans; 4) provides adequate evidence; and 5) offers a balanced discussion of the contribution, including generalizability and limitations. In addition, critical viewpoints and negative findings are welcome. For example, a critical commentary of social implications of machine intelligence, an empirical insight to algorithmic threats, or a failed replication study are valued as contributions in this subcommittee.

 

Sub-committee Chairs

  • Rebecca Fiebrink, Goldsmiths, University of London
  • Per Ola Kristensson, University of Cambridge

 

Contact: sc.compint@chi2021.acm.org

 

Associate Chairs

  • (to come)

 

Example papers:

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